Notice of continuing suspension

The biggest single factor related to the effective finishing of a basement space is ceiling height.

Basically, and in most cases, there’s rarely enough of it.

So, other than spending $150,000, to have your home raised off its foundation, or conversely, hammering out your basement’s concrete floor, and gaining the headroom by digging down a few steps, the challenge to finishing a basement involves dealing with the many ceiling obstacles. Our goal is to install a suspended ceiling.

It’s a logical choice for a basement due to the vast series of ductwork, plumbing, and wiring that may on occasion require cleaning, repair, or adjustment. The dilemma?

In order for our ceiling tiles to be installed and removed (if necessary) with relative ease, the grid components will need to be four inches lower than the floor joists above. Or, four inches below whatever’s lower than the joists.

Basically, there are three things we shouldn’t touch in a basement, being the floor joists, which support the first floor components, the beam supporting the floor joists, and the jack posts supporting the beam. If you didn’t make the connection, “support” was the key word here.

So remember, you never touch something that is, or in any way could be, supporting something else.

Unless, of course, you’re willing to put down the big bucks for some re-engineering.

If we can’t touch the posts, or the beams, or the joists, then in order to get a reasonably high ceiling, let’s look to move some of the plumbing and ductwork that are cluttering our otherwise perfectly good ceiling. If the original homeowner, or builder, didn’t have a finished basement strategy in mind, then the tradespeople would have taken the simplest, most direct route when making the various plumbing and ductwork connections.

Now that we’re talking finished ceiling, it’s time to call the plumber and HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) fellows back. Their goal will be to re-route the plumbing and mechanical venting, if possible, around what would be the future finished area. With a little imagination, and the help of some engineering mechanics or motorization, plumbing and ductwork can be directed through the utility, or storage areas of the basement.

If logistics dictate that certain plumbing lines or venting must pass through the finished area, then perhaps it can be relegated to the edges of the room. This way, the pipes and vents could be hidden by a false wall, or bulkhead, and go practically unnoticed.

As mentioned last week, we want to install the perimeter moldings first, then the main tees, placing them four feet apart, and perpendicular to the joists. With the room’s dimensions drawn to scale on a sheet of graph paper, outline where the four-foot and two-foot crosspieces will be placed.

The graph paper will allow you to more easily centre the tiles and avoid too narrow a border – less than six inches is too thin, and unattractive. Plus, it’ll strategically help you avoid obstructions such as beams and posts.

Inserting the cross pieces should not be left to guesswork, or trial and error. These components are stubborn to detach if you’ve inserted them in the wrong hole. So, avoid the hassle, and get things drawn on paper first. Having things on paper will also help you plan a lighting schedule.

Be sure to secure the help of your electrician when deciding how much recessed lighting will be necessary. What size of tile works best? The larger 2’x4’ tiles are easier and quicker to manipulate, while the 2’x2’ tiles, due to their softer, less etched surface, and recessed edge, generally look better.

If you’ve got a lot of border cutting to do, a recessed tile will require a lot of extra trimming. In this case, you may want to use a non-recessed tile for the border only, keeping the more decorative tiles for the center of the room.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

Suspended ceilings

When installing a suspended ceiling, our handyman recommends going in with a plan. Postmedia Network.

Today we’re going to be discussing the consumer’s most versatile ceiling option, that being a grid system of T-bar shaped metal tracks with either 2’x2’ or 2’x4’ sized tiles, otherwise known as a suspended ceiling.

Suspended ceilings are popular, especially in basement renovations, because the manor of assembly is a relatively quick learn, and a natural progression for those homeowners who received gold stars in kindergarten for their excellence in manipulating Lego blocks.

The grid system is comprised of four basic components — a 12 ft. wall angle, a 12 ft. main tee, along with 2 ft. and 4 ft. cross tees. The strategy to assembling the grid components in a basement involves following three basic steps. One, the 12 ft. wall molding gets installed first, using regular wood or drywall screws, and follows the entire perimeter of the room. Next, sit the edges of the 12 ft. main tees in the L-shape of the perimeter molding, making sure they lie perpendicular to the floor joists above. Then, space these main tees four feet apart.

Whether the ceiling space is square or rectangular is irrelevant. Spacing the main tees four feet apart allows you to lay the tiles (if we’re talking 2’x4’ panels) in whatever direction you wish. Laying the main tees perpendicular to the floor joists, allows you to easily support these main tees with wires strung down from screws inserted into the joists. Place a supporting wire every four feet along the length of your main tee. With the perimeter moldings installed, and the main tees secured in position, two and four foot cross tees can then be installed. This, in a nutshell, are the basic steps regarding the installation of a suspended grid.

Now, however simple this procedure seems, frustration and profanity will be your future if you don’t come up with a strategy beforehand. Because the cross tees insert quite easily, but are about as much fun to disconnect as having to undue a tight knot in a shoelace, you’re only going to want to fasten a cross tee to a main tee, or cross tee into an adjoining cross tee, once.

Getting every connection right the first time you assemble grid in a room requires either a lot of previous practice, or a plan. So, assuming you’re not a professional ceiling installer, let’s come up with a plan that’ll leave all our trials and errors on a few sheets of paper in the recycle bin. On a sheet of graph paper, outline the exact co-ordinates of the room. In order for the ceiling panels to be easily placed into the track, the entire grid system must hang four inches below the lowest beam or length of ductwork. Please understand that the four inch drop is a minimum. With the main tees measuring about two inches in depth, a four inch minimum drop leaves you with about two inches of air space to slide in, and manipulate a tile into position. If you’ve purchased a ridged tile, and because of their superior quality and sound attenuation value, I definitely recommend that you do, these panels are going to be a son of a gun to handle if you’ve shorted yourself drop space. If dropping the grid system four inches below the lowest beam is going to create a living hazard for those with futures in basketball, with the proposal that persons susceptible to head scuffing protect themselves with the coveted basement helmet, receiving little praise, then the beam may have to be left as is. In cases such as these, beams get boxed-in with drywall, or simply painted, to somewhat camouflage their existence, with the grid systems butting up to it on either side. In most basements, it’s not so much the low lying beams, as much as the low lying ductwork, that can make finishing a ceiling all the more difficult.

Next week, what to do with ductwork and other ceiling obstacles.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

Master of none

He must know what he’s doing, he has tools and a hard hat, no? Postmedia Network.

When you stop to consider how many Jacks there are in this world, it’s overwhelming.

You’ve got your quick and nimble Jack, whose co-ordination and speed were arguably never really challenged by simply jumping over a candlestick. Regardless, the task demonstrated some courage.

You’ve got the Jack who befriended Jill, Jack Sprat, Jack and the beanstalk, and the always ready for a party, Jack in the box.

A lot of Jacks for sure. So, if you’re a homeowner looking to have a number of renovations performed on your home, renovations that will include a variety of electrical, plumbing, and drywall repair, as well as some finished carpentry and detailed ceramic tile work, which Jack are you going to call?

A simple question, which fortunately has just as simple an answer. If you need plumbing performed on your home, you call Jack the plumber. If there’s a switch to be moved, or you require a few recessed lights in your kitchen, you call Jack the electrician. Drywall? Jack the drywaller. Ceramic tile needed in the bathroom? Jack the ceramic tile guy is the person for the job.

Essentially, there’s far less chance of disappointment when the task of connecting the pipe from bathtub A, to the air stack located in the adjoining wall of bedrooms X and Y, is performed by a Jack, or Jill (because there are a lot of very qualified ladies out there as well) whose profession and expertise involves doing only that.

The most dangerous Jack you can hire to renovate your home is the ‘Jack of all trades’. Jacks of all trades are enticing because they know how to do most things pretty well. As a result, they offer one-stop shopping to the person paying for the renovation. They also carry an air of confidence, due to their ingenuity, which gives the homeowner further peace of mind. Plus, the Jack of all trades will save you time and money, he or she figures, by liberating you from having to pay the going rate of registered tradespersons, while avoiding you the hassle of needing to co-ordinate the various timetables of these trades. And, for the grand finale, deal sealing piece de resistance, the Jack of all trades will comfort you with the fact all of his services will be provided without permits, quashing certain property tax increases, and eliminating any potential delays caused by those pain in the butt inspectors who have nothing better to do than scrutinize his or her work, causing further delays should something not be done to their satisfaction.

So, with one cheque to sign at the end of every week, why wouldn’t you hire such a Jack or Jill? Because, if there’s one ideal that holds true, whether it be in the world of business, sports, the trades, and/or any profession, it is that practice makes for perfect. Essentially, Jacks of all trades are unpracticed. An unpracticed Jack is a dangerous sort of animal because once out of their element, they’ll improvise. When the fan belt on your car breaks and it’s 2 a.m. on some dark, country road, you remove your tie, socks, or use whatever string or rope matter is available, and you improvise. When the copper water line leading into your home cracks just below the shut-off valve, and with a plumber hours away, you grab the roll of hockey tape out of your equipment bag, and you improvise. Otherwise, improvising isn’t a good thing.

The problem with Jacks of all trades is that improvising is their specialty, and the only thing they’re really practiced at. So, your improvised hot water tank, or shower door, or floor joist system, will likely function, but for how long? If you happen to stop by a new home under construction, you’ll notice two things. The first will be the permit on the wall, along with an anthill of co-ordinated, licensed tradesperson activity. That’s how to build, and that’s how to renovate.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

Nothing to weep about

Air movement and ventilation are a must in your kitchen if you like to cook. Postmedia Network

In case no. 647, titled “The Weeper”, we find a Mrs. Deloris W. Willow, crying a river while seated at her kitchen table.

Mrs. Willow, aka ‘the weeping willow’, due to her habitually breaking out in tears as a means of coping with her anxiety, is quite distraught over the fact her kitchen cabinet doors are beginning to delaminate. Basically, the vinyl laminate that seals and encases the particle center core of the doors, is beginning to peel back at the corners, revealing the particle substrate.

Although there are minor signs of this stress on a few of the lower cabinet doors, the more severe cases of delamination are occurring on the doors and framework of mainly upper units. “The cabinets above the stove are the worst” describes Mrs. Willow. “It’s gotten to the point where I feel I have to open the cabinet doors every time I boil water, so to lessen the effect of the steam hitting them directly.”

“Plus,” she continued, “I’ve had to move my toaster-oven from its spot under the corner cabinet, and set it on a nearby table beside the crock pot, while the underside of the cabinet that’s situated over the little toaster, is starting to peal as well.”

Being of Mediterranean descent, Mrs. Willow loves to cook. This passion has her regularly boiling water, while simultaneously operating counter top appliances, which unfortunately have created a room environment with a humidity level slightly under that of a Turkish bath. What boost of humidity her tears add to the kitchen area is unknown, but the resulting salt deposits on the counter and hardwood flooring cannot be good.

Solution? Weeping Willow refuses to modify her cooking habits, and with local fresh corn soon to be available, she expects to be keeping all four stovetop burners on high for about a three-week stretch, pumping enough boiled water to effectively change the climate zone in her neighborhood from temperate, to humid subtropical. As a result, there will be no modification or change to what’s causing the moisture and humidity issues.

Can we change the cabinet doors to something more resistant to moisture than a regular PVC wrapped product? Materials such as stainless steel or glass can hold up to sustained high moisture, but the cost of switching to such a series of doors and hardware would be exorbitant. Plus, this style of cabinetry would be far from the standard colonial or shaker type panel door that Mrs. Willow prefers. Solid wood or solid MDF cabinet doors come stained or painted, and due to them being effectively contained in this manner, would certainly resist the effects of moisture, but not forever.

Therefore, with our goal being to keep the costs of satisfaction to a minimum, and with Weeping Willow having no desire to drastically change the entire cabinetry, but perhaps replace only the affected cabinet doors, the solution to this moisture dilemma will have to be mechanical. Basically, the $50 existing range hood will have to be go, and should see its last hurrah as the feature item in next week’s garage sale. It’ll be replaced by a 400-500 cfm, exterior venting, range hood unit that will be able to expel steam as quickly as it’s produced.

Next, we’ll check the HRV (heat recovery ventilation unit). If it’s old, replace it. If it’s nonexistent, let’s get one hooked up to the existing furnace. The HRV works in conjunction with the furnace fan and ductwork, drawing fresh air in, and expelling stale air out, operating 24/7, while also balancing the humidity levels in the home.

Then, let’s allow for more air movement by de-cluttering, or basically moving those counter top appliances into drawers or cupboards. Next, replace the center light fixture with a lighted ceiling fan. We need air movement, and this will help big time. Finally, and if humidity levels remain high, we’ll plug in a dehumidifier.
Case #647 closed.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard