Asphalt shingles still number one

Asphalt shingles are still the most popular shingle, price being one of the main reasons. Postmedia Network

Asphalt shingles have received a lot of complaints.

Some people have complained so much about their asphalt shingles that they’ve decided to form a club, referred to as a class action suit, by which they formally issue a legal complaint against the asphalt shingle maker. Then, after getting some pittance of a settlement, enough to certainly cover a Tim’s run for the fellows tearing off their perceived defective shingles, they feel vindicated, then go out and buy asphalt shingles all over again.

Now, it should be mentioned that said class action suits against the asphalt shingle manufacturers were as a result of perceived problems with their line of ‘organic’ asphalt shingles, which stopped being produced in 2010. The term “perceived” is defined quite clearly in the class action results, and refers to the fact these shingle manufacturers never actually admitted to making defective goods, but have offered some type of compensation regardless, because they’re all really nice guys, once you get to know them.

Today’s asphalt shingles have a fiberglass matting, as opposed to the original paper felt, and are referred to as fiberglass asphalt shingles. So, with all these complaints and class action stuff going on, why do 90 percent of homeowners still choose asphalt shingles?

Two reasons. First, there’s the price, where at about .75 cents per square foot, asphalt shingles are minimally half the cost of regular steel roofing, and one quarter of the price of composite, cedar shake, or the more decorative steel roofing options. And two, there’s the issue of lifespan.

Essentially, the average consumer buying a roof for their home either believes he or she will not be at their present address for any great length of time, or, are doubtful their remaining days on earth will allow them to take full advantage of a premium roofing product. Often, the customers will do their ROI (return on investment)/lifetime expectancy calculation right at the service desk.

“Well Deloris, whaddya think, do we go steel or asphalt?” her husband Alfie asks. To which Deloris replies, “I don’t know Alfie… you’re 76 and I’m 72, how much longer are we going to be around?”

At this point in the conversation I usually interject with a helpful, “Listen folks, I agree, the Grim Reaper is likely sitting in the back seat of your car as we speak, regardless, the advantages of a steel roof are many, including better roof performance, enhanced curb appeal, and a sign to the next buyer that you’ve put quality products into your home”.

“Nah”, Alfie states. “You guys sell a 10-15 year shingle here?” Alfie questions, after doing some predicted lifespan mathematics on a scrap piece of paper. “Unfortunately no,”, I reply, “the least warrantied shingle is one of 25 years” I confirm. “OK, then let’s go with that,” Alfie says. And, that’s the way things generally roll in the asphalt shingle biz.

However, if a fiberglass asphalt shingle is installed correctly, there’s no reason why a homeowner couldn’t expect to get 25-30 years, or longer, out of their chosen product.

As stated in last week’s column, the keys to fiberglass shingle and steel roofing longevity, starts with stability. Stability comes in one form, and that’s plywood. So, if there’s an existing shingle on the roof, or maybe even a layer or two of shingles, remove them. If upon removing those shingles you discover a plywood substrate, terrific! Simply verify that the plywood is still in good condition. If not, repair or replace as necessary. If you discover a 1×6 or 1×8 spruce planking underneath, which was a common substrate 30 years ago, don’t remove it. Instead, cover it with a 3/8” spruce plywood.

Fiberglass shingles are a relatively rigid product that doesn’t like to bend or in any way compromise their position, kind of like the average male once they lay down on the couch to watch the hockey game. So, we avoid nailing shingles to anything but plywood.

Next week, more keys to shingle longevity.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

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