Find the source of those white stains

Efflorescence, a fibre-like mineral deposit — mostly salts — that indicates small, persistent moisture inflow. Before getting fluffy like this photo, it starts as white-coloured stains. Steve Maxwell/Postmedia Network

Got a tough laundry stain to get out? No problem.

Rinse the garment with cold water, then scrub in a little laundry detergent, let sit for a few minutes, then scrub and rinse once again.

Still not clean? OK, if were talking a piece of white apparel, try a little bleach, then rinse and scrub once again. Continue this process for 15 minutes, or until the next period of the hockey game commences.

If after giving this stain issue its due attention, the unsightly blotch consisting of a mélange of Molson Ex, chili sauce, and Dijon mustard, still persists, well, you’re going to have to live with the fact that balancing a meal on your stomach, the size of which could have fed a small village in Tanzania for two weeks, while watching the game, was probably a bad idea.

As a result, you can either live with the blotch, since a belly stain of this sort on a white t-shirt isn’t such an uncommon fashion statement for a man of your age, or toss the fine garment into a container in the garage containing various other undershirt apparel, that being the box simply labelled “rags.” Problem solved.

Now, what about house stains, and specifically, those relating to the white, powdery stuff on your brick or stone work— how does a homeowner deal with that relatively common stain issue?

Well, water, soap, and a little scrubbing will help, but it won’t solve the problem. The white residue often seen on cement floors, concrete foundations, as well as various cement sidings, including brick or man-made stone concrete products, is called efflorescence.

Taken from the French “to flower out,” efflorescence describes the action of salt in the cement product, or mortar, migrating to the surface of the concrete by moisture that has infiltrated the concrete.

Where does the salt come from? Salt exists in the ground, in the air, and can be found in just about every type of food and living organism.

If you’ve ever worn a ball cap on a scorching summer afternoon, where you likely perspired off a few pounds, then left your cap on the coat hook to dry at the end of the day, only to find a white residue having stained its surface by morning, that, in a nutshell, defines the action resulting in efflorescence.

Salt in the brick or stone gets liquefied by rain water or moisture that has infiltrated the brick. This salt infused moisture then makes its way to the surface of the brick through various pores in the product, then dries when it hits the open air, leaving a salt residue.

How do we clean off the efflorescence? First, scrub with a stiff bristled brush, then rinse with water. If the efflorescence contains calcium deposits, as well as salt, this is going to be a much more stubborn removal.

As a result, you may have to revert to using muriatic acid (diluted 1 to 20 in water). Muriatic acid is extremely corrosive. Therefore, you’re best to hire a professional cleaner for this task. They will have the proper clothing, ladders, and harnesses to safely work with this product.

The only issue with cleaning is that it’s likely a temporary solution. Efflorescence is unattractive, but not harmful to you or your brick. However, it is a sign of moisture entering the brick wall, or foundation, in some way.

So, avoiding further efflorescence issues means eliminating the cause. Basically, you’ll need to check your water management systems. This includes verifying the manner in which your landscape slopes away from your foundation, ensuring the roof valleys and flashings are effectively directing water to the roof’s edge, and everything in between. The in between stuff includes window sills, caulking around windows and doors, and making sure your roof edge properly deposits water into the eavestroughing.

If you’ve got efflorescence on your siding or foundation, moisture is somehow making its way in.

Next week, roof stains. Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

Once upon a roof

Roofing has changed quite a bit over the years. Postmedia Network

Home builders once used 1×8 spruce planking to cover the roof trusses of a new home under construction. That was once.

The strategy basically involved the following. Build the retaining walls for the poured concrete foundation using 1×8 spruce lumber. Then, once the cement was dry, the spruce planking would be removed and used as sheeting material over the roof trusses. One product, serving two purposes, and although a little labor intensive, produced hardly any clean-up or waste to speak of. In those days we also put chains on our summer tires for better winter traction, used rotary phones, and thought lawn darts to be a great summer game for the whole family.

Times have changed. Winter tires have become the standard, rotary phones are about as common as a Stanley cup parade down Yonge Street, while lawn darts have been taken off the retail consumer shelves completely, having been remarketed as the preferred weapon of choice for those low-budget mercenary types.

Was the use of 1×8 spruce planking as a roof sheeting a bad idea? In retrospect, no. Back then we were roofing homes with what was known as an organic shingle, due to its base consisting of a mixture of asphalt and wood fibers. Organic shingles were flexible, and molded themselves easily over the not so perfect 1×8 planking. Plus, warranties back then were in the 10-15 year range. So, if a roof lasted 10-12 years or so, people were generally satisfied. If tearing off these old shingles and replacing them with new ones seemed excessive, people would simply re-roof, adding a second, or even third layer of asphalt shingles. If the homeowner chose to go with steel roofing, as opposed to asphalt, then the steel would either get screwed directly to the planking, or the installer would first install 1×4 rough spruce, spaced every 16-24 inches, over the existing 1×8 planking. Either way, emphasis concerning the protection of one’s home was placed on the surface product, not so much on the substrate.

Today, roofs occasionally leak. In the olden days, they leaked a lot. Why roofs leak less today has everything to do with the substrate, along with better education and information relating to proper venting, and attic insulation. So, what have we learned over the years? 1×8 spruce lumber will expand, shrink, and with prolonged exposure to water, will of course rot. However, the main knock against the old plank system is the issue of movement. You can’t install something that doesn’t want to move, like fiberglass shingles, or steel roofing, over something that naturally, due to our varying climate and atmospheric conditions, can’t stay still. That would be like wrapping a puppy in gift paper, setting it under the tree Christmas Eve, and expecting it to stay still, without wrinkling or tearing the wrapping paper, until the surprised recipient picks it up the next morning.

When the substrate moves, screws loosen, nails pop, and when the shingle tiles separate from each other, or in the case of steel roofing, the overlap on the ridge develops a gap, your roof will no longer be water impermeable.

The first sign of a breach in the roofing system is the decorative sunburst that develops on your ceiling, or a domed ceiling fixture filled with water, enabling you to create the very unique ceiling fish bowl (just don’t turn on the power).

The key to a roof’s long term success in shedding water is stability, and that can only be achieved by nailing or screwing it into plywood. So, if you own a home with a boarded roof, be sure to remove all existing shingles, then fasten a layer of 3/8” spruce plywood directly to the 1×8 lumber. Next, cover this plywood with a quality synthetic felt, then install the required roof venting. Your roof is now ready to receive the finished product.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

The camper

Case no.424, titled ‘The Not so Happy Camper’ has us examining the case involving a Mr. Lee K. Tent a.k.a. “the camper” and his frustrations with a building supply center that inadvertently burnt his marshmallows.

As the story goes, the camper ordered a bathroom vanity and sink combination, and was told the unit would take approximately two to three weeks to arrive. A few days into week two, the camper inquired as to the exact timing of the delivery, and was given a tentative date of Wednesday, the usual delivery day for this Toronto based manufacturer, in the week that was to follow. The camper was then cautioned that due to this particular week having a long weekend, with Monday being a holiday, the vanity unit could, and most likely would, be delayed until Thursday, or maybe even Friday of that same week.

Furthermore, the camper was also instructed that as soon as the vanity arrived, he would be called, and an arranged time for said delivery established.

With that knowledge tucked safely into his zippered chest pocket, the camper threw caution into the campfire, hedged the likelihood of a timely delivery with the prayer that a long weekend in Ontario wouldn’t have the 401 backed up from Belleville to Burlington, and in anticipation of a Wednesday delivery, instructed his plumber to arrive first thing Thursday morning.

Thursday morning arrives, along with the sun, chirping birds, a plumber with a full coffee thermos, but no vanity. Camper waits until noon to call, tells the salesperson he’s been paying a plumber to twiddle his thumbs for the last four hours, wants to know when he will be receiving his vanity, and further wants to know who’s going to compensate him for the time loss and money owed to his plumber.

With the answer to this request somewhat beyond the responsibility scale of the salesperson in question, it’s recommended to camper that he speak directly with management. Upon meeting the manager, our disgruntled soul simply states, “Hello, my name is Lee K. Tent, and just so you know, I’m not a happy camper.”

Why do people camp? What’s the attraction to leaving the safe confines of your home, your couch, your fridge, and especially a bathroom only 15 paces away, to live in a ghetto of tents and trailers, where the only hint of running water is the charming sound of your intoxicated neighbor urinating against the bumper of your pick-up truck?

Although sympathetic to the emotional stress and non-substantiated financial loss of this unhappy camper, the manager unfortunately had to school Mr. Tent on the fact his high risk renovation strategy was pretty well doomed from the moment he dialed 1-800-plumber.

The strategy to ordering cabinetry, appliances, or any type of product that requires installation, should be as follows. Once the product is ordered, and an approximate timeline of delivery is established, check the availability of your preferred licensed tradesperson. Don’t book a date, simply establish a week where this installer could be available. If the product you’ve ordered is going to require several weeks to arrive, have your supplier keep you updated on its progress. When you’re told of your product’s impending delivery to your home, notify, but don’t book your installer. There are too many variables, gremlins, and unknown forces out there that could still rain on your campfire.

Next, be home when the delivery crew arrives with your cabinet, making sure to having cleared the walkway. Installing a roll of protective cardboard felt on your floor, should this unit need to be carried to a specific area, is also a good idea.

Finally, inspect the unit. If there are no dents and scratches, if it’s of the right size and color, and if there are no reasons to demand its return, call your installer.

With the camper having failed to follow any of these precautions, he was left holding his uncooked sausage, with no further compensation provided. Case #424 closed.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

Let’s be clear

Have an idea of what you need before you order from the lumberyard, says Handyman Hints. Postmedia Network

“I think I need . . . no . . . no . . . well. . . let me see, OK, make that eight pieces of 4x4x10 treated lumber, now . . . nope, that’s not right,

OK, I’m sorry about this, I’m trying to read the list my carpenter gave me, and you wouldn’t believe what just happened on the ‘Crazy Pet Tricks’ TV program I’m presently watching, OK, so make that 10 pieces of 4 by, now . . . is that a 10 or a 12 — jeepers, if I brought this list into you, do you think you could help me figure out this guy’s writing?

That, my friends, if there was any doubt, is the wrong way in which to order building supplies over the phone.

So, in an effort to make your building or renovating experience as pleasurable and less stressful as possible, let’s go over some of the do’s and don’ts of ordering and receiving lumber.

Rule no.1, keep things clear, to the point, and simple.

When ordering products for delivery over the phone, first provide the clerk with your name and delivery instructions. Then state the name of the product desired, followed by the quantity. If the list you’re following was not prepared by yourself, be sure to study and understand its contents before you dial. And, please avoid the infamous voice call relay. Trying to focus on the voice of the person ordering the product, while hearing the faint, barking echoes being delivered by the guy on the couch eating a sandwich, whose receiving his instructions by the hired carpenter in some room 20 feet further away, will be painful for whoever’s serving you.
Best case scenario is to have the person who’s performing the task, do the ordering.

I’m always flabbergasted when I meet a customer, and it’s usually some little blue haired granny, who’s been given the task by their contractor of searching for and picking up a list of specialty items they’re totally unfamiliar with. That would be like granny asking her contractor to pick up the necessary ingredients for Crêpe Suzette.

Also, don’t be the fellow who walks up to the service desk, grabs a notepad from beside the cash, takes about 30 seconds to draw a series of sticks and rectangles, adds in a few numbers, then pushes the sheet back to the clerk with an inquiry as to how much it’s going to cost to build a deck of this size. Again, all we’re asking for is a little respect for the world of retail, and the consumer beside you who may not want to stick around while an attempt is made to decipher your chicken scratch.

If you’re the builder, and we’re talking about a relatively simple project, go to bed early, get up with the sun, make yourself a coffee, then sit down at your kitchen table and figure out exactly what products you think you’re going to require. Then, take that run down to your local building supply dealer.

Even with a complete list, there will likely be questions. However, it’ll be a much quicker procedure if you, as the builder, are prepared. If you’re not the builder, and simply want to get a quote on the material cost of a project, be sure to set up an appointment with an estimator. Calling to make an appointment, or requesting a meeting by e-mail with a specific estimator, is best. Dropping into a building supply center, and expecting an estimator to be free to give you immediate estimating service, is hit and miss. So, to avoid disappointment and loss of time, call ahead.

How to handle deliveries? One, be home. And two, clear the walking and dumping area of any obstacles. Power lines are the big ticket item the delivery trucks don’t want to snag. As a result, the driver’s eyes are usually looking up as they back up, and not down at the tricycle left carelessly at the edge of the driveway.

Next week, checking what you’ve received. Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

Permit me to ask

I don’t like having to get a building permit, basically because the whole process is a pain in the butt.

Building permits, due to the rules, regulations, and compliances that accompany even the changing of a kitchen sink, inevitably incur delays. That being said, I’d still never start a project without one. And, until somebody comes up with a more streamlined version of today’s turtle-like procedure, building permits are the public’s only assurance, or confidence, that what they’re investing in has been properly assembled.

A lot of homeowners find little need in procuring a building permit. They justify this omission by hiring experienced carpenters, or people that just know how to do things. This way, they save a few bucks on labor, permits, and the future tax hit. Unfortunately, this strategy is short sighted. You personally, may be comfortable with the fact a few buddies from keg league hockey and yourself managed to create extra living room space by removing a couple of walls that may or may not have been load bearing, but what’s the next home dweller going to think?

That’s why you get a permit, because it’s as much for you, as it is the next fellow. Permits and the accompanying structural drawings, are the next buyer’s only assurance that whatever renovation was performed on your home, was done correctly.

Which, brings us to case #245, tag name “Stairway to Heaven”, and involves a young couple visiting a century old farm house that had most recently been put up for sale. As suspected, and somewhat expected, the floors of this former farm house were a little crooked. Which is understandable. After 120-plus years of supporting weddings, births, and funerals, expecting a floor of this age to remain true and level would be a little unjust. Plus, this type of floor slant is often coveted, due to it providing generations of occupants with what’s regarded as the ol’ homestead advantage when it came to games of pool or salon bowling.

Generally, a little forgiveness to straight and level would be afforded a home of this age. As the couple progressed through the home, and ventured into what was most likely an addition, the unevenness of the floor became even more evident. Unfortunately, the present day occupants were unable to relay any information regarding the year this addition took place, and of course had no permit documentation for reference.

So, we know the house is old, has slanted floors, and that someone, at some point, built an addition. House is a little crooked, floors are a little crooked, and the addition, without documentation, is a little suspect.

I know, happens all the time. A home is purchased, then usually renovated, then gets sold to a younger generation that wants to implement their own changes or additions all over again. It’s the life cycle of a home. However, without documentation, how is the next buyer supposed to feel comfortable mortgaging their future on such an investment?

Moo…ving along, the visitors find themselves upstairs, to which they notice a steel framed spiral staircase, leading up to a finished room in the attic. Not sure, but the last time I visited the homes situated at Upper Canada Village, I didn’t notice many second floor spiral staircases. Most likely because heat retention was key to survival, whereby the opening up of an attic for supplementary space would have been considered a deathblow. So, the chances of this oddity being part of the original 1887 house plan were unlikely. Documentation and stamped engineered drawings relating to having cut open the ceiling joists and modified the 120-plus year old rafters? None. Assurances that this undocumented, permit-less, and otherwise unauthorized renovation won’t lead to roof collapse, where this circular stairway to the next level may indeed be this young couple’s stairway to heaven? Again, none.

Recommendation to this young couple, who otherwise found the house quite endearing. Walk away. Case #245 closed.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

Cementing your future

This guy knows what he’s doing. You might not, when it comes to working with cement. Postmedia Network

Today we’re going to be dabbing into the trade of mixing and applying cement.

I use the term “dab” because cement work, or concrete repair, isn’t something the average office softie ought to jump into full bore. Unless of course through a series of bad investments or sure bets gone lame at the track, you’ve indebted yourself beyond the point of recovery, and as an example to others you’ve been persuaded to jump into a bucket of soon to be cured concrete by fellows simply known to you as “Vito” and “the Razor”, let’s otherwise limit this first stab at concrete to a small repair.

Regardless of what type of concrete, be it wall, floor, steps, or walkway, is in need of repair or resurfacing, the strategy to preparing the area remains pretty well consistent.

First we scrub the area being repaired (using a steel, or otherwise stiff bristled brush), then sweep the surface clean with a fine, softer bristled broom. Next, rinse the area with the garden hose or spray bottle of water. Brush, sweep, rinse, that’s basically the prep work required for concrete repair.

Be sure to wear safety goggles and gloves at all times. Pre-mixed concrete powders usually have a Portland cement additive, which is corrosive. Not that these components will eat through your skin like battery acid, but with prolonged exposure, will certainly cause irritation. Should you get any powdered mix in your eyes, simply douse your face with water.

Tools for the job will include a bucket, trowels (pointing and pool), a quick mixer, and a drill. A pointing trowel is triangular in shape, and is handy for shaping cement to form a corner on a wall or step. A pool trowel is basically a rectangular trowel with rounded corners. Square cornered, or drywall type trowels, will gouge the finish as you spread the concrete mix over a wider surface, such as a platform or walkway. The pool trowel simply allows you to more easily float the trowel back and forth without creating too many lines.

A quick mixer is essentially a heavy duty whisk, or blender, that fits into the chuck of a regular drill. Don’t walk into this project without your quick mixer, thinking its function could be replaced by a paint stir stick and a little elbow grease, with the 15-20 buck investment better spent on a Tim’s run for coffee and muffins.

Depending on your choice of pre-mixed concretes, the working and setting time for many of these compounds is anywhere between 15 and 20 minutes. So, if after 5-6 minutes of stirring, an old hockey injury starts to creep back into play, requiring you to take a few moments of down time to wipe your brow and work the kink out of your shoulder, upon returning to the pail, you may find your first batch of mixed has turned into a secondary anchor for the boat.

The convenient aspect about the concrete repair products available today is that they come in a pre-mixed powder. This powder formula contains both the cement components, and the necessary bonding agents, which basically enables these new cement products to stick to older, existing surfaces. Don’t be intimidated by the number of various cement repair products you’ll find on the shelf of your local building supply store. The industry has become task specific, which was designed to simplify things, but on the other hand has created shelves full of pictured containers that can certainly leave the first time shopper a little bewildered. My suggestion is to let the salesperson know what type of repair project you’re attempting, then let them help you choose the most suitable mix for the job. Although there is certainly some crossover in that some pre-mixed cements could perform a number of tasks, you definitely wouldn’t want to choose a poly-plug compound (which dries in two minutes) and use it to build up a broken step corner that may take you 5-10 minutes to shape.

Good cementing.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

Paint like a pro, not a monkey

What type of painter are you meticulous and thorough, or apelike?

There are two types of painters.

There are those who simply walk into a room, use their hip to shove the couch and recliner out of the way, pile their supplies directly on the hardwood floor, then open the can of paint with a four-inch nail. These are referred to as monkey painters, or Neanderthal type decorators, referencing the fact this degree of painting excellence could probably be equaled by a primate, or a human being whose concept of painting has yet to evolve past the stage of spreading mud on a wall with their fingers.

Those who meticulously fill every crack, seal every miter joint, then fill and sand every dent beforehand, are called finishers, and that’s the type of painter you want to be.

Before preparing the wall though, prepare the room. Basically, whatever’s not nailed down to the floor should be removed. Painting requires space, and even though it may seem like a plausible strategy to simply push everything towards the center of the room, it’s important to eliminate the risk factors associated with tripping over a rolled up carpet while carrying a full can of paint. Plus, if you’re going to be repairing drywall and sanding, why add the task of cleaning the furniture to your to-do list.

Next, line the perimeter of the room with cloth drop sheets. Avoid using clear plastic for this task. Cloth sheets absorb paint drops, unlike sheets of plastic that basically support the droplets, allowing you to periodically step into these mini puddles, then track the paint throughout home should you forget to leave your shoes in the room when you go for a coffee break.

Next, wear clothing deemed expendable, or that you’ve worn for previous painting jobs. Although most paints are listed as water soluble, for whatever reason that doesn’t really apply to clothing. So, if a drop of latex paint should land on your pant leg, you’d have about 15 seconds to disrobe and get your new pair of jeans under a stream of hot water before these Levis officially become paint wear.

Also, avoid the white, one piece “painters” outfits that zipper up at the front. Wearing one of these suits at a gathering this past Halloween cost me about 10 pounds in essential life fluids, and reminded me of my high school wrestling days of trying to make weight by jogging with a garbage bag on.

Use a paintable latex caulk to seal the miter joints, as well as the gap between the casings or baseboards, and the wall. Don’t use a silicone or exterior caulk because that’s what you have hanging around, and because it’ll save you a trip to the building supply center. Your paint won’t stick to these types of caulk, which will be frustrating.

Small dents or nail holes in the wall can be filled with a pre-mixed product called spackling, or sheetrock 20, a just add water powder that dries and sands in about 20 minutes. I like the powder form because it stores easy, and never really goes bad, so there’s always wall repair stuff on hand. For larger holes created by the elbow or fist of a person under duress, be sure to use a fiberglass tape, along with a dust control compound. Fiber tape is self-sticking, so it’s just easier to use, while the dust control compound does exactly what it suggests, and limits the amount of airborne dust due to sanding.

Next, choose only the best of brushes and rollers, and invest in a good quality of paint. Buying dollar store brushes is like attempting to chop down a tree with a dull axe, while a good brush equals the efficiency of a chainsaw. Plus, a quality angled brush will save on the necessity of using painters tape. The same goes for paint, where anything under 15 bucks per gallon would be little more than colored water. The better paints have a thicker consistency, and as a result will apply more evenly, while requiring fewer coats.

Good painting.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

Committing to painting

So, you’ve decided to pass on the calling of a professional, and have committed to painting the living room, dining area, and kitchen, yourself.

Very well then . . . hopefully this endeavor won’t come back to haunt you in the same manner as your last two decisions, where your choice to capture and raise park pigeons, in an effort to revitalize the medieval ‘bird transit business’, ended up in the crapper after confidential memos were randomly dropped off at whatever destination the creatures decided to stop and poop, followed by your personal attention given to the dismantling and replacing of the hot water tank in the basement, which inevitably garnished your home with the neighborhood’s first indoor heated swimming pool.

One of the biggest challenges to painting involves choosing and coordinating colors. If you find people are consistently complimenting you on your apparel, and the manner in which you happen to co-ordinate this particular scarf with that particular color of bonnet, and how the whole softness of your wool jacket and contrasting crocodile skinned boots creates a wondrous flow of color and texture, then you’re likely more than capable of choosing your own colors. If, on the other hand, you choose to wear black every day, because it’s easy, and have no problem wearing socks with your sandals, then style may be your handicap, dictating the real need to seek help with the matching and choosing of colors. Otherwise, you’ll end up picking a series of taupe, light greys, and slightly off-white colors for your walls and moldings that will look absolutely uninspiring.

If you don’t have a stylish friend that can help you make a few riskier color choices, then hiring an interior decorator for a few hours would be a wise investment. Another strategy related to the risk management of choosing colors, is to invest in a few litres of some of your preferred choices before going all in. Spending hundreds of dollars on a paint, based on a color chip the size of a Toonie, can be risky indeed, especially if the choice was made under the bright fluorescent lights of your local paint supply store. Colors will look different under a natural light, or even the lighting in your home. So, unless these colors have been chosen by the trained eye of a decorator, I would recommend investing in a litre or two of the colors you’re thinking of going with.

Once a few litres of colors have been chosen, paint a small section of the wall, maybe even in a few spots, then wait a day or two. If, after this time period has expired, you’re still okay with your color choices, then you’re safe to invest in the required gallons, or 20 litrr pails of product. If you don’t think you can spend the next few years living with your living room choice of hot pink, alongside a traditional sunshine yellow for the kitchen, give the painted spots a coat of primer and start the process over.

As far as sheen is concerned, use a semi-gloss paint for your doors and moldings, an eggshell or satin finish for the walls, and a flat or mat finish for the ceiling.
A coat of primer is always a good thing, but is most necessary when you’re painting new drywall, or if the wall is water, oil, or smoke stained. A coat of primer is also recommended when transitioning from what was an oil based paint, to an acrylic or water based paint, and if you’re looking to put a light shade of paint over an existing wall that is medium to dark in color.

Should the primer be tinted? If you’ve chosen a medium to deep tone color, tinting the primer is a good idea, and should save you from having to roll on a third coat. Color matching? Not a problem these days. Simply bring in a small sample of the color you like, and the computer eye will match it perfectly. Next week, more painting tips.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

Before we paint

Do it yourself, or hire a painter?

Just like plumbing work should be done by plumbers, and electrical work performed by electricians, better painting results happen when you hire a painter.

So, before embarking on a project in which you’re no more qualified to paint, as you would be to change the oil in your car’s engine, perhaps a call to one of our local professional painters would be best.

Painting seems like an easy do-it-yourself project because it’s a surface thing. “After all”, as some people say, “you’re just covering one color of paint with another color of paint, it’s that simple”. Those are the same people who never play golf, but refer to it as a game where all you have to do is put the little white ball in a hole almost three times its diameter.

As anybody who’s performed a proper job of painting knows, the quality of the finished product is directly related to the effort put into preparing the wall. Holes and dents in the gyprock will need to be puttied, sanded, and primed. The gap above the baseboards will require a paint grade caulking in order to smoothen the transition between molding and wall. While this same caulking will be required to seal the miter joints of any casings and ceiling crowns.

Sure, you could avoid these steps and go straight to rolling on paint, just like you could skip putting snow tires on your vehicle come December, or not toss a cube of butter into the fry pan before cracking in a few eggs, but the results will be disappointing.

What about paints that contain no VOC’s (Volatile Organic Compounds) or are low in VOC’s, are these a better choice than regular paints?  Volatile Organic Compounds are the chemical fumes you smell when you open up a gallon of paint. Some people react to these fumes by getting a headache, or by suffering an irritated throat, or itchiness in the eyes and nose. So, if you’re the type of person who’s sensitive to smells, or this type of chemical off-gassing, then choosing a Zero-VOC, or Low-VOC paint, likely makes sense. The only issue with choosing a No-VOC or Low-VOC (less than 50 grams of volatile organic compound per liter of product) is that you’ve limited yourself to the contractor level and mid-range quality paints, along with a color choice of white, white, or white, since the VOC content is graded on a base white paint before any coloring is added. Contractor and mid-range quality paints are fine, and are the preferred choice in new homes since there exists the very strong chance of the homeowner wanting to change color schemes after a year or two.

So, there’s no need to spend $45 per gallon for the best of quality, instead of $22 bucks for a generally good series of paint, until people have lived in the home for a while, with the final color scheme yet to be decided. The top quality paints are thicker, provide a better color base, offer a tougher, more cleanable surface, and they apply nicer and more evenly.

Therefore, there are several good reasons why a homeowner would invest in a high quality paint, or for the sake of accent or decorum, use bright and vibrant colors on the walls of their home. However, the VOC content will undoubtedly go up a bit. That’s why spring is such a good time to paint, because the VOC content of some of those deeper colors or quality paints can be largely subdued by opening a couple of windows and placing a few oscillating fans in the rooms under renovation. Or, as suggested earlier, hire professionals, and let them deal with the fumes while you enjoy the sunny outdoors.

Picking your own home’s colors? Can be risky. Some have the background to do this well, while others have difficulty matching their shoes with their socks. Next week, good color choices.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

Get the lint out

(Getty Images)

Before spring fever hits us and your promise to clean the dryer ductwork gets filed in behind your spouse’s 2013 request to “remove Christmas lights from spruce tree in front lawn,” let’s get what we need to make this job as quick and easy as possible.

A key tool for this task will be a shop vac. Along with the TV remote control and vice grips, a dependable shop vacuum easily ranks in the top three of must-have tools. So, if you don’t have one, get one.

Or, if that special person in your life has a birthday or anniversary on the horizon, few things say love like the hum of a shop vac.

Other tools for the job will include aluminum duct tape, and a 25-foot length of 1-1/4-inch flexible sump pump hose. Notice my reference to the fact your ducts will require aluminum duct tape, and not the popular grey duct tape referenced in Red Green’s quote “duct tape is only temporary, unless it works.”

Based on the premise that if you wrap something enough times, it’s bound to stop leaking, or, if it weighs more than 50 pounds, there’s no shame in having to secure it with a second roll, the grey, material type duct tape – unlike what the name suggests –  is not recommended for ductwork.

The grey duct tape, over time, will dry up, shrink, and lose its elasticity.

So, if you’ve got a leaky boot, broken rear view mirror, or forgot to pack your suspenders, grey duct tape will get you through the next few days, but it’s not to be considered for ductwork.

So, realizing regular duct tape should only come into contact with a dryer if for some reason the door needs to be taped shut, let’s move on to cleaning the ductwork. Dryers that vent directly to the exterior are a pretty quick clean.

However, is your clothes dryer is somewhat centrally located in the home, then the exhaust may be travelling upwards of 30 or 40 feet. These are the instances where clean ducts are essential to the safe and continued good operation of your dryer. If lint collects and clogs the duct, then overheats, it can ignite.

Some of the key strategies to keeping your dyer ductwork clear include using 60-inch lengths of solid four-inch pipe, along with the four-inch solid (manipulatable) elbows. Furthermore, always use aluminum duct tape to connect and seal the duct work joints, and never screws.

Duct screws, even the very short ones, will snag the lint, causing it to accumulate and clog the duct. Accordion type ducting, especially the cheap white plastic stuff, should be avoided as well, simply because the bumpy accordion surface will reduce the effectiveness of the dryer fan, causing lint to collect in the folds.

If flexible ductwork is necessary, use the aluminum product as its folds are extremely small, and much more conducive to proper air flow.

For easier cleaning of your solid-pipe dryer ductwork, consider adding a short length of aluminum flex pipe at the halfway point in the assembly. Ductwork that’s taped and sealed at every joint can be a burden to dismantle, while simply unclamping a piece of flex hose will take only seconds. Once you’ve dismantled a duct connection somewhere between the dryer and the outside, peer into both lengths with your flashlight. The amount of lint you see stuck to the edge of the duct pipe will give you a good indication of how air is flowing. If the lint clumps are quite severe, you’ll have to re-strategize the exhaust route.

Next, stick the sump hose onto the shop vac attachment, start up the vacuum, then wiggle and gently shake the sump hose as you bury it inside the ductwork.

Conversely, switch the shop vac hose to blower, and the pipe can cleaned by blowing lint towards the exterior.

Good venting.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard