Why we wrap

We need to wrap our outdoor things, mostly the structural wooden outdoor things, essentially for two reasons.

One, painting doesn’t cut it anymore. And two, we’re not quite as handy as our fathers, in general, and not even close to comparing with the handiness of our grandfathers, again in general, when it comes to having an aptitude, or even desire, to fix things ourselves. So, when you’re as unhandy as our, and this next generation is, albeit through no fault of our own, since we were focused on watching the Brady Bunch after school, instead of learning how to change the oil in our parents’ cars, with this next generation preferring not to risk losing a finger on a table saw, when there’s still level 10 to achieve in PlayStation’s Resident Evil 7: biohazard game, you can understand how we failed as a society to maintain most of our home maintenance competence.

The issue with exterior paints and stains is that they simply can’t last any more than a couple of years in our climate zone. As a result, homes with wood posts, wood spindles, wooden decks, or wood sidings, all require maintenance. And, since we’re not so competent, or have the desire, or are too consumed with other affairs to really dedicate much maintenance time towards our wood structures, our homes are often left to the mercy of the elements.

When that happens, the home loses every time. So, in order to maintain the dignity and curb appeal of our homes, without actually having to maintain them, it’s imperative that we cover, or wrap our wood things, with something better than paint.

First thing to consider wrapping, or replacing, are your porch posts. Often made of either 4×4 or 6×6 treated lumber, square or turned wood posts can look good for a few seasons. Then they twist a bit, crack a bit, and all of a sudden, don’t look so good. Painting or staining a post can help camouflage the issue for a while, but unfortunately, there’s no hiding a crack. So, instead of replacing a weathered post, we wrap ‘em. Even though a post has twisted, and suffered a few cracks, the compression strength of a 4×4 or 6×6 timber is still strong. As a result, and in order to avoid the engineering challenge of replacing a post that’s structurally supporting a roof or overhang, we suggest wrapping the post with a PVC vinyl sleeve. As long as the post remains dry, it’ll avoid rotting, and maintain its strength.
Because the copper injected into treated lumber will sometimes corrode other metals, we don’t recommend wrapping a treated post with aluminum. The vinyl sleeves are an easy install, even for the unhandy, whereby the four walls that make up the sleeve simply snap together. These PVC sleeves also come with a number of decorative crown and base options that snap together as well, then get glued to the wrap, effectively turning a wood post into a very impressive white column.

Next, consider using PVC trim boards. Trim boards are moldings used to enhance the exterior look of a window or door by providing a four-five inch picture frame type border around the perimeter of these units.

Trim boards also serve well to border the base of the homeowners chosen siding, getting installed just above the foundation line, while providing an equally decorative border molding along the top, running just below the soffit. Trim moldings are attractive because they’re slightly thicker than the siding, and effectively help define the windows and doors, along with the general lines of the home. Unfortunately, by protruding out in this manner, wood trim pieces would often succumb to rot, simply due to the rain and snow matter resting on the edge of these moldings. With PVC trims, rot can’t happen.

Next, if you’ve got a wood deck in need of replacing, modification, or maybe we’re talking about a new build, it’s time to consider composite decking.

Next week, the maintenance free deck.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

That’s a wrap

When building, we need to wrap or protect most of the lumber, while leaving a portion exposed so that the wood may be allowed to ìbreatheî or basically expel moisture at a more natural rate. Postmedia Network

I think the inventors of Baggies sandwich bags, and Saran Wrap, are two of the most intelligent and opportunist people in the world. Intelligent because they’ve managed to develop a lightweight, flexible, and user friendly manner of sealing and protecting foodstuffs. Opportunists because they’ve not only developed something useful, but have enabled us, as humans, to fulfill one of our most instinctive and powerful needs, and that’s the simple desire of wanting to wrap things.

What do we do with a newborn baby? Although it’s referred to as a swaddle, we’re essentially wrapping ‘em. Bloody finger? Wrap it. Christmas gifts, sprained ankle, hole in the car’s muffler? Wrap, wrap, wrap.

After supper the other night, I wrapped or bagged 10 different leftover items and tossed them in the fridge. Approximately 50 per cent of these items will see action in the immediate future, two to three things might be caught in time for use, with the last one or two items forgotten and allowed to develop into 15 types of mold. Regardless, they were all good wraps.

What do we do with a staff meeting that’s gone 30 minutes into overtime? We wrap it up. So, what do we do with basically any wood project or structure? Well, if you’re still not sure as to the theme of this week’s rant, for the good of the wood, you wrap it. For all intents and purposes, plywoods, basic framework, and wooden posts, will stick around for the long term if they’re kept dry. The strategy to keeping wood dry in a four season climate such as ours is challenging because wood is a product that naturally absorbs moisture. So, with a “dry season” unfortunately not forming part of the four seasons we experience, our plywoods and 2×4 framing lumber are always in a state where they’re retaining some level of humidity, regardless of the fact the lumber was kiln dried at some point in its production. As a result, we can’t simply saran wrap every piece of lumber because that would trap the humidity, which would lead to our lumber looking like the aforementioned science experiment regarding the 15 types of mold. Instead, we need to wrap or protect most of the lumber, while leaving a portion of the plywood or lumber exposed (with these exposed sides usually facing the interior of the building) so that the wood may be allowed to “breathe” or basically expel moisture at a more natural rate.

So, whether you’re building a shed, or 3000 sq. ft. home, we always protect the plywood walls with a house wrap. Because the interior, or what’s referred to as the warm side of a standard, insulated wall, must have a plastic vapor barrier, in order to prevent moisture from entering the wall cavity, the outside wall cannot be saran wrapped, or covered in the same manner, because that would trap the moisture already in the plywood, and stud framework. So, we cover the exterior wall with a house wrap, a product that sheds water, should rain or snow makes its way past the siding, but is still porous enough to allow the wood to breathe.

Our plywood roofs require the same type of protection. Although asphalt paper was for the longest time the product of choice, synthetic felts are the better product. Similar to a house wrap, synthetic roof felts shed water and breathe. However, they differ from house wraps in that they reflect UV light, and are far superior to paper felts because they can protect a roof for up to six months, which is a real bonus when inclement weather causes unforeseen delays.

Other areas in need of protection are the wooden framework around windows and doors. When the caulking around a window or door frame begins to shrink or crack, water infiltrates into the wall and puddles on the sill, leading to mold or rot. For this reason, we now wrap three out of the four sides of the wooden frames with a rubberized membrane.

Next week, more on wraps. Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

Living on the edge

Imagine the dinner conversation around this live edge table. Postmedia Network

Why would anyone want to attend a rock concert where the lead singer is 74 years old? Because in this case, the fellow with the microphone in his hand is Mick Jagger, and the band behind him is called the Rolling Stones.

This ain’t the “Hot Rocks”, the “Rolling Pebbles”, or some tribute band you can catch for 15 bucks at the local watering hole, or grand opening of another Suds ‘n Duds dry cleaning outlet. We’re talking being in the presence of arguably the greatest rock ‘n roll band of all time, along with 30,000 others, enjoying the real thing. Real things, or seeing real things live, have value, and that’s why they demand the big money.

That being said, not all senior performers can draw a crowd. I play old-timer hockey with a bunch of former great athletes, guys who used to fill their respective barns to the rafters come playoff time. These days though, the crowds are a little slimmer, where the average attendance Tuesday nights has unfortunately dropped to about one, and that includes the Zamboni driver. But don’t kid yourself, challenge any one of these guys to a chug a lug, or pie eating contest, and they will bury you.

This need or desire to own, see, feel, and touch the real thing, has developed a niche in the world of furniture known as ‘Live Edge’. Live edge basically describes the strategy of using slabs of trees to serve as table tops, shelves, desk tops, and if cut from a large enough, and long enough tree, even board room tables.

Now, why buy a slice of a tree trunk, complete with the worm holes, cracks and splits, along with the mishmash of color and grain patterns you’re bound to find on a slab of raw wood? Not so strangely, it’s these general imperfections in the wood that make each piece so naturally attractive, and of course unique.

We live in a world where a tree is sliced up, graded, then cut up into smaller pieces, graded again, then glued back together in an attempt to achieve the most perfectly uniform table top, or cabinet door. Plus, and depending on where and what you’re buying, so called wood furniture these days is about as close to being 100% real wood, as a multi-chain, fast food hamburger has of being 100% real beef. In other words, there’s a lot of particle core furniture out there, and it all looks good and seems solid enough, until of course you have to move it, or reassemble it, a second time.

So, if anything, live edge wood slabs are a refreshing change to what we see every day. If you’ve been to some of the larger cities, live edge products can be found in specialized or boutique type retail outlets. You’ll know when you’re in a boutique type store when the person serving you is a size 2, very fashionably dressed, and offers you an expresso coffee if you happen to show the least bit of interest in the boardroom table, fashionably priced at $22,000.00.

The big city outlets usually offer South American type species of wood, which no doubt cost a bundle, considering this lumber is harvested from a rain forest, then sailed down an Amazon River filled with piranha, while surrounded by a jungle occupied by tigers and other man-eating creatures.

So, in all fairness to the seemingly high price point requested by these boutiques, there’s a cost of shipping factor tied to these products that we usually don’t experience in Cornwall and area. Regardless, creating your own live edge furniture won’t be near as pricey as the finished versions if one, you sand and finish these slabs yourself, and two, stick to local species of wood.

Simply google “Goodfellow Live Edge” to see what’s available, and the possibilities that exist, in the world of real live lumber.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard