The only thing that looks like wood, is wood

Wood siding is beautiful, but takes work to maintain. Postmedia Network

Case no. 215, titled “the winds of change” has a Mr. Martin V. Particular, aka ‘MVP’, due to his prowess on the local seniors pickleball circuit, looking for a solution to an exterior siding problem he and his wife Penny P., aka Penny Poo, have been dealing with for several years now.

The Particulars own a home with a beautifully stained, pine horizontal siding. The situation? The back of the home faces the south-west, and therefore sees a ton of prolonged sunlight, while having to suffer through the brunt of our inclement weather. The problem? Stained wood sidings don’t exactly thrive under these conditions. As a result, Martin finds himself sanding and re-staining the backside of his home on practically a biannual basis, due to the finish having peeled or crackled.

MVP doesn’t so much hate the task of sanding and staining, since the results make for a very attractive, and unique type of real wood finish, but of course the time involved in keeping this siding looking pristine is edging into his practice sessions, which is killing the chances of him and penny Poo maintaining their no.1 ranking on the seniors mixed doubles tour.

Homeowner’s goal? Martin and Penny are looking for a comparable, horizontal, maintenance free type of siding that will match the color of the three other exterior walls of the home. The challenge? The “V” in Martin V. Particular often stands for “Very”. So, this isn’t simply a case of saying goodbye to a high maintenance wood product, and replacing it with any number of composite, vinyl, steel, or fiber cement type sidings available on the market today. The very Particulars are looking for something that is both maintenance free, and a close match to the walnut stained pine planks on the balance of their home.

Likelihood of success? You’d have a better chance of convincing the Habs Carey Price to switch from goaltending, to filling the vacant no.1 center position between Max Pacioretty and Brendan Gallagher. Unfortunately, the only thing that looks like wood, is wood. The composites and various other maintenance free sidings all somewhat resemble wood, and to the neighbor driving by at 80 km per hour, basically looks like wood, but when put side by side with wood, usually makes for a disappointing match.

So, with Martin Particular being very particular, finding a suitable alternative to his existing pine siding has to this point been fruitless. Suggested plans of action? The existing pine siding is beautiful, and in good condition, with the only issue being maintenance. So, instead of replacing it, why not protect it? In essence, all this southern facing wall needs is a little shade.

Extreme option no.1, bring in three 40 ft. hard maple trees. Otherwise, the Particulars should perhaps extend the roof over their backyard deck and patio. Or, consider installing either one large, or a couple of pergolas along this same backyard deck area. If this southwest facing wall is getting too much sun, then so too are the Particulars. The MVP and Penny Poo are already getting more than their share of vitamin D due to regular outdoor pickleballing. With a pergola providing intermittent shade, or full shade if you chose the aluminum model with the movable louvers, it may be the best and least intrusive solution, since a pergola is self- standing, and requires minimum deck preparation.

Or, paint the wall. Painting would keep the shape of the wood siding intact, but obviously forfeit the warmth of the wood grain. However, paints last longer than stains, and require only repainting, as opposed to the more arduous task of having to sand, stain, and seal. Otherwise, this wood siding may have flat-lined, or basically served its purpose, and it’s time for MVP to call it.

The alternatives to wood are many, with several pre-finished steel and aluminum sidings offering beautiful, wood grain type finishes.

Until further notice, case no. 215 is closed.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

Watch fall temperatures

If you’re planning on doing some caulking in the fall, make sure the temperature is at least 5 degrees celsius. Postmedia Network.

So, you’re finally getting around to preparing your home for the winter. Great!

Fall is an excellent time to be doing outdoor work. Not too hot, not too cold, and with the days getting shorter, darkness will force you to quit your tasks at a more reasonable hour, placing you safely in your slippers so that you may be fed and couch bound with a beer in your hand, well in time to catch the start of the hockey game.

What is the task at hand? To bolster our home’s system of defense. Who is the enemy? The demon is well known, and is the same, notorious culprit that’s been slowly destroying homes for years, that being water. It’s form? Rain, snow, sleet, or basically anything that pours or puddles. Strategy? To seal by means of a paint, caulking, or mastic (roofing and foundation cements), anything that resembles or what might be described as a crack.

There are a lot of products that form the exterior shell of the home, and the cracks are usually found where one of these products, such as your windows and doors, butts up against a foreign product, such as a brick or vinyl siding. The products themselves are usually fine, whereby the inherent design of a window, or the manner in which brick or vinyl siding is installed, are by themselves perfectly functional in diverting the elements. However, the challenge to the builder is joining two products such as these to form a watertight seal. Achieving this goal will require the installer using various membranes and flashing products, with the finishing touch to this assembly being a bead of caulking. Over time, it’s the bead of caulking that’s going to shrink and crack, which leaves the homeowner with no other choice but to re-caulk this important first line of defence.

Start by examining the roof (binoculars will help) specifically where the roofs flashings contact either the roof vents, or the side of the home, and make note of where the deficiencies, or problem areas are. Follow the same procedure for all windows and doors.

Although the fall weather provides a comfortable working atmosphere, the challenge at this point will be the falling temperatures. Caulking, paints or stains, and mastics, install better and more easily when the temperatures are at least 5 degrees Celsius. When the mercury drops below this basic user line, you risk the product not sticking properly to the surface it’s being adhered to. When caulking doesn’t stick, it won’t seal, which will mean having to follow this process over again next season.

Basic step number one, remove the paints, caulking, or mastic products from the car and put them somewhere in the house as soon as you get back from the building supply center. Don’t leave them in the garage, or forget them in the trunk of the car overnight. When caulking and mastics are left in temperatures that are close to freezing, they don’t squeeze out of the tube so well. When a cold caulking is moving slowly up the spout, the novice user will become impatient, and inevitably begin to over-squeeze the caulking lever, which usually results in the caulking blowing out the bottom of the tube. A caulking backfire has yet to result in serious injury, but the resulting gooey hands, and loss of what was a perfectly good tube of caulking, will be frustrating.

Next, watch the weather reports, and choose your time accordingly. You’ll want to install the caulking or mastic (roof repairs) while the temperatures will be in the 5 degree Celsius range for two to three hours.

If you’re hoping to do some fall painting or staining, or if the foundation is in need of parging, then you’ll require a 24-hour window of plus temperatures, due to these water based products taking longer to cure. So, if frost is expected overnight, you’ll have to wait until the next warm spell before proceeding.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

Cementing your future

This guy knows what he’s doing. You might not, when it comes to working with cement. Postmedia Network

Today we’re going to be dabbing into the trade of mixing and applying cement.

I use the term “dab” because cement work, or concrete repair, isn’t something the average office softie ought to jump into full bore. Unless of course through a series of bad investments or sure bets gone lame at the track, you’ve indebted yourself beyond the point of recovery, and as an example to others you’ve been persuaded to jump into a bucket of soon to be cured concrete by fellows simply known to you as “Vito” and “the Razor”, let’s otherwise limit this first stab at concrete to a small repair.

Regardless of what type of concrete, be it wall, floor, steps, or walkway, is in need of repair or resurfacing, the strategy to preparing the area remains pretty well consistent.

First we scrub the area being repaired (using a steel, or otherwise stiff bristled brush), then sweep the surface clean with a fine, softer bristled broom. Next, rinse the area with the garden hose or spray bottle of water. Brush, sweep, rinse, that’s basically the prep work required for concrete repair.

Be sure to wear safety goggles and gloves at all times. Pre-mixed concrete powders usually have a Portland cement additive, which is corrosive. Not that these components will eat through your skin like battery acid, but with prolonged exposure, will certainly cause irritation. Should you get any powdered mix in your eyes, simply douse your face with water.

Tools for the job will include a bucket, trowels (pointing and pool), a quick mixer, and a drill. A pointing trowel is triangular in shape, and is handy for shaping cement to form a corner on a wall or step. A pool trowel is basically a rectangular trowel with rounded corners. Square cornered, or drywall type trowels, will gouge the finish as you spread the concrete mix over a wider surface, such as a platform or walkway. The pool trowel simply allows you to more easily float the trowel back and forth without creating too many lines.

A quick mixer is essentially a heavy duty whisk, or blender, that fits into the chuck of a regular drill. Don’t walk into this project without your quick mixer, thinking its function could be replaced by a paint stir stick and a little elbow grease, with the 15-20 buck investment better spent on a Tim’s run for coffee and muffins.

Depending on your choice of pre-mixed concretes, the working and setting time for many of these compounds is anywhere between 15 and 20 minutes. So, if after 5-6 minutes of stirring, an old hockey injury starts to creep back into play, requiring you to take a few moments of down time to wipe your brow and work the kink out of your shoulder, upon returning to the pail, you may find your first batch of mixed has turned into a secondary anchor for the boat.

The convenient aspect about the concrete repair products available today is that they come in a pre-mixed powder. This powder formula contains both the cement components, and the necessary bonding agents, which basically enables these new cement products to stick to older, existing surfaces. Don’t be intimidated by the number of various cement repair products you’ll find on the shelf of your local building supply store. The industry has become task specific, which was designed to simplify things, but on the other hand has created shelves full of pictured containers that can certainly leave the first time shopper a little bewildered. My suggestion is to let the salesperson know what type of repair project you’re attempting, then let them help you choose the most suitable mix for the job. Although there is certainly some crossover in that some pre-mixed cements could perform a number of tasks, you definitely wouldn’t want to choose a poly-plug compound (which dries in two minutes) and use it to build up a broken step corner that may take you 5-10 minutes to shape.

Good cementing.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

Accessorizing your exterior siding

When a fellow’s out buying himself a new suit, there should be more on his mind besides purchasing the standard jacket and a matching pair of pants. He should be thinking accessorize.

If he’s to look like the real deal, he’ll probably need a dress shirt, perhaps a new tie, matching belt, and if you’re going all out, don’t forget the argyle socks and a little pouf for the side pocket.

Women, on the other hand, generally have accessorizing down to a science. They already know that the purchase of a dress would not be complete without the appropriate jewelry, purse, three pairs of shoes, light jacket, new microwave oven for the kitchen, and more cat toys for Fluffy.

However, and although versed on the concept of accessorizing, couples tend to forget the many trim options available to them once they’ve chosen their exterior siding. After deciding on either a vinyl, wood composite, or cement board type product, then having made the color choice, the next topic should be a discussion on the trim-board.

Why use a trim board around windows and doors? For the same reason PK Subban chose to accessorize his beaver pelt overcoat with a purple fedora at last season’s Winter Classic All Star game. Because it looks good.

Now, I’m not suggesting the use of trim-boards around your windows and doors will have an impact equal to such a fashion statement. However, the reasoning behind trim-boards is simple. Homes with trim-boards look more attractive than those without.

What is trim-board and what’s its purpose? Trim-board is a 1-inch thick piece of either lumber, composite, PVC material, or cement fiber product, depending on which siding you’ve chosen. Generally, when you chose a composite or fiber cement type siding, you would stick with the matching composite or fiber cement trim-board. Trim-boards are available in board widths anywhere from 3-1/2 to 11-1/2 inches wide. The 3-1/2 and 5-1/2 inch wide trim-board planks are the sizes chosen most often for around windows and doors. The wider boards are the preferred choice for skirting along the base of the siding, and for use as a fascia board. Trim-boards, along with the appropriate trim-molding, can also be installed just under the soffit, creating a beautiful crown molding type of accent that follows the roofline. Depending on your tastes, trim board planks are available with either a smooth, or woodgrain type finish.

Color? Trim board color is of course subjective. Painting the trim boards the same color as the siding will provide a much more subtle touch or impression. When the trim boards are color matched to the window frames and soffit material, presuming these two components are of a different color than the siding, the effect has considerably more impact.

The purpose, or raison d’être of trim-board, is to enhance. Today, most window units are made of vinyl, or combinations of vinyl and aluminum. And, with more emphasis being placed on window operation, and on getting more glass for the buck, the frames have become much narrower than the wooden framed windows of the past. With less window frame, comes less window, and as a result, less impression. So, we offset this loss of window frame by adding a matching trim board around the windows and doors. Wide, outside corners, are another way trim-boards can add a more stately impression to any home. Most sidings come with standard 3 inch wide outside corners.

New home builders, or those renovating, should consider 5-1/2 inch trim-board planks for the corners instead. For a few bucks more, this easy modification will deliver more than its weight in value and good looks. Key to successful trim-boarding? Don’t make them an afterthought. Use the thicker, 1 to 1-1/4 inch planks, and install them before the siding. After the fact means using a thinner board, delivering less impact, while also creating gaps (otherwise known as homes for wasps and spiders) along the siding ridges.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

The little things are important

Today we paint the exterior of our home.

And, whether the challenge at hand be your wood siding or backyard deck, it’s the little things relating to this task that are going to maintain your optimism.

Outdoor painting or staining isn’t easy. Optimally, and under the right conditions, this job can be relatively bearable. In most cases, we spend these hours of labour hating ourselves.

Keys to painting bliss? Get the little things right, starting with your choice of clothing.

Acrylic paints, which supposedly clean up with soap and water, are actually about as water soluble as a hockey puck. If you happen to sprinkle a blotch on your pant leg, you’ll have two choices.

Either disrobe immediately, then soak the area under warm water. Or, two, realize that disrobing on your back deck could initiate a reaction by the neighbourhood watch committee, and simply accept the fact you’ve just devalued your designer pants by about 90 per cent.

When it’s time to paint, I go to my closet, get out my painting jeans, paint stained T-shirt, paint stained windbreaker, if it’s a little breezy, and paint stained running shoes.

All these items were, at one time, perfectly good pieces of clothing I thought I could get away with wearing, while painting, if I was really careful. In other words, clothes worn during painting, inevitably become permanent paint wear.

Next, invest in an official paint lid pry-tool, rubber mallet, and have a roll of Saran wrap handy. I couldn’t find my lid prying tool the other day, and instead used the closest thing within reach, that being a flat headed screwdriver.

The lid, of course, opened, but not after somewhat damaging the rim. No big deal once, or twice, but by the third non-regulation opening, you might as well consider the balance of the paint a loss, and either give whatever you’re painting a third coat, paint something else, or save it for the hazardous waste day, weekend drop-off.

So, with the paint lid prying tool probably the handiest thing you’ll have in the toolbox for under a buck, you’re best to invest in a few of them.

Rubber mallet? Used for closing the lid of course, offering a firm, but soft touch. A regular nailing hammer is overkill, and will permanently dent the lid, making a good seal impossible once that happens.

Saran wrap is key to you having a well-deserved coffee break without risking the brush and top skin of the paint drying up. Simply tear off about a forearm length of plastic, place all but the handle of the brush down on the wrap, then dexterize the bristles by folding the brush over and over again until you’ve reached the end of the plastic. Finally, fold any excess plastic over the top of the brush. To temporarily seal the paint, tear off about a foot of saran wrap, lay it over the open can, then gently press the lid back on the can.

Use just enough force to hold the lid in place. Place the brush and paint in a cool, shady spot, fire up the coffee maker, and enjoy your toast and jam.

Next, wear gloves. I like the heavy duty, plastic type gloves that practically reach up to your elbow, instead of the tight surgeon style. The heavier gloves won’t provide the same dexterity, but can be removed more easily, just in case the phone rings, or you require another sip of coffee. And, they won’t tear, allowing you to handle those heavier chairs and tables while you’re painting.

Last, but definitely not least, plug in the radio, blasting away your favourite tunes, or set on sports talk, where once again, the debate regarding Montreal’s demise will be rehashed and attributed to Carey Price’s injury, and the fact GM Marc Bergevin couldn’t manage toddler ball hockey at the local day care.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

Ye old shed, and how to fix it

Just a guess, but we're thinking, tear it down. Handout/Cornwall Standard-Freeholder
Just a guess, but we’re thinking, tear it down. Handout/Cornwall Standard-Freeholder

“How do you fix up an old shed?” This was the question posed to me by a lovely, 20-something young lady, who just recently purchased an older home with a handsome, 20-something young man.

I mention the ages of the participants because timing is significant, and will certainly affect the strategy in addressing the crooked shed issue. If this were an elderly couple, I’d say forget about the shed, concentrate on booking your next tee-off date and getting your meds straightened out, then let the next guy worry about it.

If you’re middle-aged then I’d recommend taking a flamethrower to this mess, or plowing it into the ground with a bulldozer, depending on which ‘over the top’ method of ultimate doom you prefer. Then I’d recommend building something brand new in its place, at least three times bigger (because by this age we all collect too much stuff) along with the real possibility of adding a finished loft area over top.

But, if you’re young, full of dreams, with the weight of the world having yet to have you cry out in pain as you attempt to pull your socks on in the morning, this old shed project will provide an excellent learning experience in basic framing, siding, and roofing.

First, are we talking an old wood shed, or banged up steel shed? Wood we can possibly work with, whereby a steel (or tin) shed, in poor condition, has the approximate value of a couple of Bell Center playoff tickets in Montreal.

What to do with the pile of dented, steel panels, once you’ve completed disassembly? Toss them in the back of a borrowed pick-up truck (make sure all the participants are wearing gloves) and drive this mess over to the local metal scrap yard dealer. At between 100-130 bucks per ton in reimbursement value, this procedure, whereby 200 lbs. of scrap metal might cover the breakfast special at the local diner, is far from a get rich quick scheme. However, it’s recycling, helps fill your tummies for a few hours, and certainly beats the ‘toss it in the bush’ method used by previous generations.

So, what’s the procedure regarding our decrepit wood shed? First, assess the damage. Crooked we can work with, rot or decay we can’t. And, we definitely don’t want to take the risk of this shed collapsing. Therefore, if once the shed’s contents have been removed, you discover that the sill plates and wood flooring are soft due to decay, secure a chain from the shed to the aforementioned pick-up truck, and pull this baby down.

In most cases, the siding (be it wood paneling, plywood, cedar shake, or vinyl) as well as the roofing shingles, will have been severely neglected, and will need to be removed. Once that task is complete, re-assess the floor and stick framework. Wet’s not a problem, soft and splintering into pieces is. So, if all is good, or a few problem pieces can be safely replaced, get the shed back to square and level by adding a few wall studs, and steel cross bracing if necessary. Building permits aren’t required for sheds of 100 sq. ft. or less. Therefore, if your shed is of the popular 8×8 configuration, I suggest extending the floor and framework to the more spacious 8×12 size. What makes a shed more easily usable, while effectively keeping out the varmints, is the entry door. So, spend a few extra dollars on a more reliable double steel door, or roll-up garage door type of system.

Windows or skylights? Natural light is always a good idea.

Type of siding? Choose something that will either match or complement the home. Vinyl siding is a popular choice, due to it’s easy to maintain good value. However, a painted wood siding, such as a board n’ batten, or channel siding, will look quite charming, and definitely enhance the look of one’s backyard.

Thanks for the suggested topic BB, and good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

Suiting up your home with siding

Conrad Hofmeister, installs siding in this July 6, 2015 file photo in Grande Prairie, Alta. Alexa Huffman/Grande Prairie Daily Herald-Tribune/Postmedia Network
Conrad Hofmeister, installs siding in this July 6, 2015 file photo in Grande Prairie, Alta. Alexa Huffman/Grande Prairie Daily Herald-Tribune/Postmedia Network

Whether you’re building a new home, addition, garage, or storage shed, one of the big decisions is going to be choosing the kind of siding that will best suit your investment.

Key to success? Don’t fret over which siding will be the easiest to install, or conceivably last the longest, resist dents or scratches, require painting, or cost you more or less money.

If you’re going all brick, or all stone, then there’s nothing to worry about. But, if you’re going to require a siding other than brick or stone, whether it be to accent the home, or completely cover it, then siding your home with the proper product, or one that best “suits” the home, is key.

Basically, siding choices can be slotted into four categories, vinyl, composites, cement board, and real wood.

Vinyl siding can be the least expensive of the three, if you’re considering the standard horizontal lap pattern, or the most expensive, if you happen to like one of the heavier stone or simulated cedar shake sidings.

One thing to keep in mind about vinyl siding, it doesn’t play well with others, and tends to look best on its own. So, if vinyl siding is what you’re leaning towards, then go vinyl all the way.

It’s often been the strategy, when building a modest sized new home, to install brick on the facade, with the three remaining walls relegated to regular vinyl.

This “looks good from the street, because the sides and back don’t matter so much” mentality only cheapens the structure, and let’s everyone know your house plan is fresh out of the 70’s.

So, if you can stretch the budget in order to have four brick walls, then terrific, you’ll end up with the classic “wolf will never blow me down” Ontario type home.

If the budget is fixed, then consider putting your brick facade money towards a higher quality, deeper tone, more refreshing and updated vinyl colour scheme on the entire house.

“Doesn’t vinyl siding fade, or break easy should it get struck by a hockey puck in the winter” is a question we field often.

Fade? Yes, and like everything else exposed to the sun, perhaps a little over time. And break easy? Well, things break easy when hit by hard, fast moving objects, just ask Brendan Gallagher of the Montreal Canadians.

The convenient thing about vinyl siding is that it’s probably the easiest type of product to replace, even if the damaged panel is in the middle of a wall.

Solution to the puck issue? Build your kid a decent perimeter of rink boards. Otherwise, vinyl siding is a respected, harsh weather product.

Matter of fact, vinyl siding is the preferred product in the Maritime provinces and along the east coast, which arguably endures Canada’s toughest weather conditions.

Although style and affluence minimally affect the numbers, where cement-based products have failed, due to the constant moisture and corrosiveness of the sea air, and where wood and composite sidings require constant paint touch-ups and general upkeep, vinyl sidings do very well.

Composite sidings include such brand names as Canexel (wood fiber base) and Goodstyle (wood chip base). Composites are the closest thing to looking like real wood, and have the advantage of being significantly more stable than wood, which means they don’t warp or crack like wood.

Like real wood sidings, composites are a good accent product for stone and brick homes. Cement-based sidings, such as James Hardie board, work extremely well in our weather zone, and a super tough, fire proof, good looking siding that can work on its own, or act as an excellent complement to your brick or stone home.

Like wood, composite and cement products will require painting every 10-12 years, but don’t let this fact discourage you from the many great features of both these sidings.

Good building

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

JM in and out

In an effort to make our newly purchased, older home, a little cozier, we’re going to be adding ridged John Mansville polyiso insulation board (made right here in Cornwall, by the way) to both sides of our exterior walls.

Why insulate both sides? Because our dated walls have too many holes, or weaknesses in its construction. Weaknesses that may not have been a concern 50 years ago, when gas was cheap and chopping wood was still in vogue. However, with the price of energy today, this barn is really going to be a heating money pit.

Holes do as poor a job keeping the cold out, as they do keeping the heat in. So, we address the comfort issue by insulating both sides of the wall. Basically, if we could replace the exterior walls, we would. But assuming our budget doesn’t include removing the roof with the same crane that was commissioned to lift and lower the lengths of International Bridge one section at a time, the next best solution is to bolster the insulation value of the exterior frame.

Further bonuses to choosing the John Mansville board solution. One, it won’t disturb an often delicate wall structure that may contain anything from lead paint to asbestos filled insulation. And two, wrapping both sides of the exterior wall will make things absolutely air tight. So, that cool draft you feel up the wazoo every time you step out of the shower will soon be a forgotten morning ritual.

Step one, remove the existing wood, vinyl, or composite siding. Brick homes can be covered directly with John Mansville board, while covering a stone house (for aesthetic reasons) should be avoided. Step two, install the John Mansville polyiso board to the wall studs, with the reflective side facing the interior. Next, cover the John Mansville board with a house wrap. If the John Mansville polyiso board serves as a heavy sweater, the house wrap is its light windbreaker jacket over top. Although the ridged insulation board will basically seal the home, house wrap is a good idea because it effectively protects the John Mansville product from the elements during the construction phase, and against any moisture that infiltrates the siding in the future.

Next, install 1×3 spruce strapping vertically over the house wrap, fastening it through the John Mansville board and into the exterior wall studs. The 1×3 strapping provides a can’t-miss target for installing your siding. Plus, it provides a key, ¾ inch air space for wood and composite sidings, which require this type of drying zone behind the product in order to avoid rot or paint peeling issues. Now, with 1-1/2 inches of JM insulation board, along with the ¾ inch strapping, and considering the thickness of the siding, won’t all these exterior coverings cause a challenge to finishing around the windows? Very likely, but nothing a roll of aluminum flashing in the hands of a qualified installer can’t correct.

Is it a good strategy to install an insulation board and siding before replacing the windows? Or, shouldn’t the windows be replaced before replacing the siding? There’s no doubt that in a perfect renovation world, and with the budget to do so, replacing the windows along with the siding is as good a 1-2 punch as you can get when it comes to turning around a home’s curb appeal and value. However, if budget constraints will allow you one renovation per year, insulation and siding, in most cases, is cheaper than window replacement, and the better value.

New windows are terrific, but you’re still replacing glass with glass. So, start with the furnace, then the siding, and put the money saved on heating towards new windows the following year.

Inside the home’s exterior walls and ceilings? Basically the same procedure as we did outside. John Mansville board (3/4 inch) glued directly to the existing drywall or plaster, 1×3 strapping overtop, followed by a 6 mil. vapour barrier, then regular drywall to finish. As is common practice, be sure to start with the ceiling insulation panels and drywall first, then the walls.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard