Get the lint out

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Before spring fever hits us and your promise to clean the dryer ductwork gets filed in behind your spouse’s 2013 request to “remove Christmas lights from spruce tree in front lawn,” let’s get what we need to make this job as quick and easy as possible.

A key tool for this task will be a shop vac. Along with the TV remote control and vice grips, a dependable shop vacuum easily ranks in the top three of must-have tools. So, if you don’t have one, get one.

Or, if that special person in your life has a birthday or anniversary on the horizon, few things say love like the hum of a shop vac.

Other tools for the job will include aluminum duct tape, and a 25-foot length of 1-1/4-inch flexible sump pump hose. Notice my reference to the fact your ducts will require aluminum duct tape, and not the popular grey duct tape referenced in Red Green’s quote “duct tape is only temporary, unless it works.”

Based on the premise that if you wrap something enough times, it’s bound to stop leaking, or, if it weighs more than 50 pounds, there’s no shame in having to secure it with a second roll, the grey, material type duct tape – unlike what the name suggests –  is not recommended for ductwork.

The grey duct tape, over time, will dry up, shrink, and lose its elasticity.

So, if you’ve got a leaky boot, broken rear view mirror, or forgot to pack your suspenders, grey duct tape will get you through the next few days, but it’s not to be considered for ductwork.

So, realizing regular duct tape should only come into contact with a dryer if for some reason the door needs to be taped shut, let’s move on to cleaning the ductwork. Dryers that vent directly to the exterior are a pretty quick clean.

However, is your clothes dryer is somewhat centrally located in the home, then the exhaust may be travelling upwards of 30 or 40 feet. These are the instances where clean ducts are essential to the safe and continued good operation of your dryer. If lint collects and clogs the duct, then overheats, it can ignite.

Some of the key strategies to keeping your dyer ductwork clear include using 60-inch lengths of solid four-inch pipe, along with the four-inch solid (manipulatable) elbows. Furthermore, always use aluminum duct tape to connect and seal the duct work joints, and never screws.

Duct screws, even the very short ones, will snag the lint, causing it to accumulate and clog the duct. Accordion type ducting, especially the cheap white plastic stuff, should be avoided as well, simply because the bumpy accordion surface will reduce the effectiveness of the dryer fan, causing lint to collect in the folds.

If flexible ductwork is necessary, use the aluminum product as its folds are extremely small, and much more conducive to proper air flow.

For easier cleaning of your solid-pipe dryer ductwork, consider adding a short length of aluminum flex pipe at the halfway point in the assembly. Ductwork that’s taped and sealed at every joint can be a burden to dismantle, while simply unclamping a piece of flex hose will take only seconds. Once you’ve dismantled a duct connection somewhere between the dryer and the outside, peer into both lengths with your flashlight. The amount of lint you see stuck to the edge of the duct pipe will give you a good indication of how air is flowing. If the lint clumps are quite severe, you’ll have to re-strategize the exhaust route.

Next, stick the sump hose onto the shop vac attachment, start up the vacuum, then wiggle and gently shake the sump hose as you bury it inside the ductwork.

Conversely, switch the shop vac hose to blower, and the pipe can cleaned by blowing lint towards the exterior.

Good venting.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

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