Painting’s more than picking up a brush

Painter’s tape being applied to a baseboard. POSTMEDIA NETWORK

Painting tradespersons don’t get the respect they deserve.

This is due to the belief most of us feel we’re generally capable of painting a room with little consequence, while delivering acceptable results.

True enough, few people have electrocuted themselves or flooded the home’s basement as a result of performing a poor paint job. Plus, cuts and bruises are minimal, and although painters tend to keep their fingers over the course of their career, there was the tragic beheading of Sir Edward “Eggshell” Egleton, by order of the Earl of Warwick in 1645, due to a sloppy effort of painting where the ceiling met the stained crown trim, a treasured molding of the Earl. Unfortunately for Eggshell Egleton, who prided himself on a revolutionary paint texture that duplicated a beloved breakfast food, but whose trimming hand was a little shaky, masking tape would only be invented 300 years later, and painter’s tape, another 50 years after that.

All to say, dipping a brush into a can of paint is relatively easy.

The key to getting from this point to a desirable finish, while avoiding any headaches, will take a whole lot of care.

First, organize your supplies. Besides the paint, angled brushes, pans, roller cages, and refills, you’ll need a few canvas drop mats, drywall repair compound, painter’s tape, and paintable caulking.

The key to achieving a nice finish is to first prepare the surface. No matter how good the paint, it won’t camouflage nail holes, dents, or smooth out a poor drywall repair job.

If your goal is to paint the room in one day, pick up a bag of ‘sheetrock 20.’ This powdered, just add water compound can be sanded 20 minutes after it’s applied.  If time is on your side, regular joint compound will require 24 hours to set.

First, clear the room of as many obstacles as you can. Although you’ll be using a water-based paint, removing paint splatter off the kitchen table or the coffee maker will be a pain in the butt, especially if the droplets go unnoticed for a few hours.

Using a narrow putty knife, and a small plastic container you’ve salvaged from the recycle box, mix a small amount of sheetrock 20 to a cake icing consistency. Then, apply it over the holes and rough surfaces.

Next, start taping. Professional painters avoid taping because it’s time consuming, costly, and because they’ve in most cases mastered the technique of trimming. Unless you’re a medical surgeon or dismantle bombs for a living, odds are that with the amount of coffee and medication in your system, your hand stroke is about as steady as gas prices on a holiday weekend.

So, protect the things you don’t want to colour with a painter’s tape, and not masking tape. Painter’s tape is a new-and-improved version of masking tape, and is designed to seal as soon as paint makes contact with its edge.

Besides your crown, window, and door moldings, be sure to tape around the doorknobs and light fixture bases as well. Once you’ve finished applying the painter’s tape, the ‘sheetrock 20’ will be ready for sanding.

Next, lay your canvas drop mats in position. The canvas mats are more expensive than the plastic or paper protective coverings, but they spread and handle far better. The canvas mats are available in 3’x20’ or 4’x12’ formats, which is convenient when moving from wall to wall.

Try not to walk on the mats as you paint. Otherwise the droplets they’ve absorbed will end up on the soles of your slippers, with your trips back and forth from the fridge well documented from that point on.

Even though you’ve protected things with a painter’s tape, begin the painting sequence using a quality tapered brush around the moldings and where the wall meets the ceiling. Once the molding’s been painted, remove the tape as soon as you can. This way, any paint that’s made its way under the tape can be easily rubbed off.

Good painting.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

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