What to do about slow drains

Why does my kitchen sink drain so slowly?

It’s a question asked by many a frustrated homeowner after post supper cleanup has once again created a sink full of murky water.

Not surprisingly, the answer to this dilemma is quite simple. Basically, you’ve tossed, or have been tossing, something down the pipe other than water.

Solution? First, this may require a change in lifestyle. In other words, stop crushing food waste and vegetable cuttings through the sink drain basket like it was some type of manual garburator. Perhaps it’s time to get into the habit of composting.

Plus, make sure all oil, grease, and food matter get wiped clean off those pots and pans, then get tossed into the garbage. When the only thing going down the kitchen drain is soap and water, the chance of future clogs drops to zero. Concerning this present kitchen drain clog, you’ll either need to retrieve whatever waste matter you’ve allowed to go down the drain, or you’re going to have to flush it through.

Please avoid the toxic waste strategy. Otherwise known as the lazy man’s answer to a clogged drain, a quick fix chemical solution like ‘Plumber butt in a drum’ is a horrible alternative. One, you’re handling something where even inhaling the fumes is hazardous, let alone spilling a little on your hands.

And, for those septic system people, it’s probably the worst thing you could put into the tank, which eventually reaches the soil. Plus, if the chemical solution doesn’t de-clog the drain, and you continue the attempt to flush water through, the toxic liquid will back up into your sink, or dishwasher, and all appliances you have hooked up to the main kitchen drain.

When that happens the fumes will bowl you over quicker than news of the PK Subban trade. Then you’ll have to deal with what is essentially a toxic spill, where your sink and appliances will have to be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected.

Drains that move slowly, or continue to clog, could be due to a plumbing issue. Drain pipes need to be vented to the open air in order for waste water to flow properly. So, if the drain in question is lacking a proper air vent, or this air vent is blocked, or the cheater vent, a small mechanism used to vent a pipe when connecting to the main stack isn’t convenient, is jammed shut, then this will have to be remedied.

Or, the slope of the drain pipe could be too steep, or too level. Drain pipes need to be sloped to 1/4 inch per foot, and be of the correct size. A larger than necessary diameter of pipe will not be helpful in creating good flow if the water being fed into it is minimal.

Venting, as well as pipe slope and diameter, are issues that should be checked and corrected by a certified plumber. If the sink contains a few inches of standing water, try plunging. Similar to a toilet plunger, except smaller, and, try not to get the two mixed up, a sink plunger should be able to shake things up to the point where there’s at least a little movement.

Once the sink is dry, set the tap to hot, fill the sink back up to a few inches deep, then repeat the plunging. If plunging doesn’t work, you’ll need to insert a sink auger, a.k.a. snake, into the drain, pushing and twisting it until the entire length is buried in the piping.

Still not de-clogged? Get a bigger snake. Or, insert a “Y” with cover into the drain pipe in a section that may be close to the clogged area, normally where several pipes converge. Be sure to have a garbage pail, shop-vac, and towels at the ready, because who knows how much water is backed up. Then, try a longer drain auger. If all fails, then call in the professionals.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

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