What’s $25 worth? An intact delivery

We understand delivery vehicles with proper suspension systems, harnesses for effectively securing building supplies, and various other safety features relating to the proper transport of heavy materials, do exist.

And, that the person power, to effectively and safely deliver these products to your home, then in some cases, carry these often heavy or large items up or down a set of stairs, also exists. Then why do people pick up their own stuff?

Maybe it’s timing (I need it now), or quality control (I want to choose my own lumber), or justification (I told my wife we needed a new pick-up truck, including the leather, massaging seat option). Or, it could simply be to save a $25 shipping cost.

Regardless of why persons decide to pick up their own goods, as opposed to paying for qualified personnel – because it’s not as if people hire a plumber every time they change a faucet, or hire an electrician to remove a light fixture – it might be a good thing to review the basic dos and don’ts of picking up building supplies and delivering them to your home, yourself.

First, how’s your general health? And, how’s your lower back?

Picking up lumber one piece at a time from a pile that’s been stacked by others isn’t quite like having loaded and stacked the goods yourself. Pulling a back muscle, or straining your shoulder, will have your project coming to a complete halt. Then there’s the call into work Monday morning, advising the HR department your aunt Flora has died, again, and that you’ll need a few days off.

Second, do you have the appropriate vehicle?

Just the other day a fellow was witnessed supporting one end of a box of vinyl siding, while the other end of the box rested in the trunk of the car, with this fellow’s buddy driving the car ever so slowly down the road.

Vinyl siding comes in a relatively ridged cardboard box that measures 12 feet long. So, with five feet of the box secured in the trunk, and the remaining seven-foot overhang seemingly up to the task, the boys were on their way. After a few bumps in the road, relatively ridged cardboard will unfortunately inherit all the integrity of cooked spaghetti. So, with seven feet of not-so-ridged cardboard now dragging on the pavement, the boys adapted to the situation, effectively turning an automobile into a gas-powered wheelbarrow. How this delayed mid-afternoon traffic, or whether this procedure would have been frowned upon by the Ministry of Transportation is unknown.

Realizing that building supply personnel are only available for suggestion, and prefer not to critique the logic or transportation strategy regarding the safe handling of goods, do-it-yourself transporters should look to follow a checklist of requirements.

One, items sticking out past your bumper or tailgate by more than six feet will require a red flag. Regardless, you will have put yourself in quite the pickle should someone rear-end you, with this little red flag meaning little if the lumber was deemed loaded in a questionable manner. So, if your vehicle cannot properly contain the load with six or less feet of overhang, have it shipped by your building supply dealer, or borrow a bigger truck.

Next, use ratchet-style straps or good ol’ fashion rope to secure your load, while avoiding bungee straps. Bungee straps are for holding down trunk lids, or for securing a tarp over a pile of wood, but due to their stretchiness, should never be used to secure a load. And, if you’ve ever been whipped in the face by the little hook on the end, you’ll know never to overstretch them.

Finally, OSB plywood (aka Aspenite) is about as stable as a deck of cards left out on a windy day, with many a load dumped at the intersection once the light turns green.

So, be sure to secure your supplies from any forward, backward, or lateral movement.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard