Think of your everyday siding

Today we’re going to be talking about fibre cement, composite, and vinyl siding, discussing the big three in preferred home siding choices.

Why do these products occupy the top three positions? Because they all satisfy what most homeowners desire in a siding— that being relative good looks, low maintenance, and low cost, or somewhat coincidentally, the same qualities one might look for in a mate if you’re a balding, middle-aged fellow who’s had little luck cruising the dating sites.

Are these sidings to be viewed as somewhat lesser than? Absolutely not.

They may not carry the same prestige as stone or brick, but when you consider price and longevity, they’re definitely the homeowner’s best value.

What about real wood siding?

Choosing real wood siding is like dating a member of the Kardashian family— essentially, beauty with an extreme price tag, along with a tonne of maintenance.

Why choose a fibre cement siding?

The grain of a fibre cement plank has been designed to duplicate cedar, which results in a look and texture that is very familiar, and quite traditional. Plus, it’s a 90 per cent sand and concrete mix, which essentially makes it fireproof and extremely durable in extreme-weather conditions, carrying a 50-year warranty.

At three pounds per square foot of coverage, fibre cement is the heaviest of the big three, and just feels solid to the touch, which will be comforting for the homeowner.

Cons to fibre cement?

Although the homeowner will love the elements of weight and rigidity, your contractor is going to hate you for it, which may result in a few more complaints, a few more hired hands, and two extra Tims runs per day.

Fibre cement installs like a wood product, using trim planks (also made of concrete) around windows and doors, as well as for outside corners, instead of J-trims and other pre-bent support moldings.

Last thing to know about fibre cement, it’s a painted product (15-year warranty), which of course means you may have to paint it again one day.

Composite sidings are products such as Canexel or Goodstyle, and are a mixture of wood fibres and various bonding agents. The raison d’être, and/or selling feature of these two composites is they provide the homeowner with a product that looks and feels like wood, without all the headaches of a real wood siding, including warping, cracking, or rot.

Essentially, Kardashian looks without having to escort them through a day of shopping for makeup, getting their hair styled, and trying on yoga wear.

Available in a variety of both solid and stained colours, composite sidings come with a similar warranty to fibre cement— 15 years on the finish, and up to 50 years on the product itself.

Why choose a composite product?

It’s the closest thing to real wood in both texture and stain. Because composites are basically real wood products that have simply been shredded up and re-glued back together again, they cut, nail, and are an easy carry, just like wood. As a result, composites are a very install-friendly product.

Composite wood sidings can be installed in a manner similar to wood, using matching trim boards for around windows and for use on the corners, followed by a bead of caulking along the seams and joints, in true ‘old school’ wood-siding mode.

Or, for a cleaner look, and what would be my recommendation, is to forgo the caulking and instead use the appropriate J-trims and joiner clip-type moldings.

Next, vinyl siding.

Definitely the least expensive option of the three, except for the heavier shingle, accent type of profiles, vinyl siding wins hands down as the best value product in home building.

Essentially, for under a buck per square foot, you’ll be investing in a siding that’ll require basically zero maintenance, and will last forever, or until which time the olive-green colour you chose in the mid-80s drives you mad.

Vinyl siding foe? Only one: a back deck barbecue in close proximity.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

A siding we will go

Conrad Hofmeister, a siding installer with Trend Home Improvement, uses a hammer to nail vinyl siding to a house while standing on a platform near 98 Street and 79 Avenue on Monday July 6, 2015 in Grande Prairie, Alta. ALEXA HUFFMAN/GRANDE PRAIRIE DAILY HERALD-TRIBUNE/POSTMEDIA NETWORK

Today we’re going to be reviewing the more popular home sidings, including fibre cement, composite wood, and of course vinyl siding.

Brick and stone sidings won’t be discussed because they’re permanent siding options, basically lasting forever, or until which time the home succumbs to some natural disaster, or due to its favourable location, gets bulldozed into the earth by an international buyer intent on building some modern monstrosity.

On the other hand, most non-structural residential sidings have lifespans, generally providing 20 to 40 years of protection.

A couple of weeks ago, I mentioned steel siding as being the future of siding, which it is, albeit at a somewhat premium price of $6 to $10 per square foot.

Otherwise, let’s just say we’re narrowing our siding choices down to those products that fall into the affordable, good value, Brendan Gallagher (Montreal Canadiens, crash the net and accept the consequences) type of category.

Next week we’ll feature foam and papier-mâché sidings, in our Mike Babcock (Leafs coach) series, covering overpriced, lousy return on investment types of products.

Ranging in price from $1 to $3.50 per square foot, vinyl, fibre cement, and composite wood sidings are your best value because they are of a good enough quality to usually outlast their warranty periods, which can be anywhere from 25 to 50 years. Yet, they’re inexpensive enough to trash if after 20 years you’re simply bored with your home’s colour scheme, or need to remove the siding if your new strategy is to boost the insulation value of the home’s exterior walls.

As discussed a few weeks ago, if you’re looking to re-side your home, or are building a new home, wrapping the exterior of the home with a ridged insulation foam board is an excellent first step to greatly improving the home’s energy efficiency.

Modestly priced sidings, regardless of their great value, sometimes get a bad rap from the brick and stone people, who question why anybody would choose a siding that would theoretically allow the home to be penetrated by a sharp object, or even some mildly significant force. And, this would be a legitimate concern, if we lived our lives with the daily fear of being attacked by time-travelling troupes of barbarians from the 12th century, looking to pillage our homes of our copper wine goblets and gold candlestick holders.

But those occurrences are rare.

We’ve lived in an old stone home in the past. We essentially roasted in the summer, and froze in the winter, with the thought or our exterior walls being able to withstand the force of a cannon ball offering little peace of mind.

For most homeowners, choosing between a fibre cement plank, composite board, or vinyl siding, is mostly done on appearance, or colour selection, with each product having its own particular traits. On the one hand, they all look like wood, but then not quite; and, they all have their own series of support products to ensure a clean finish.

The support products, such as J-trims, starter strips, outside corners, and the various caps and venting mechanisms, are all key to your siding’s longevity. So, be sure to follow the exact installation procedures of your chosen siding.

The connectors used between the planks of a composite siding may not be the first choice of an installer who prides themselves on being an expert with a caulking gun.

Regardless, caulking changes colour within a year and might last five or six years. The appropriate connector molding may cost a buck per piece, but will last 25 years. So, make the enlightened choice.

Fibre cement differs from vinyl and composite in that it’s fireproof, abuse resistant, and can handle extremely high winds and inclement weather. However, fibre cement is not a coastline siding, and will decay in salty air.

Does this mean we can’t have a cement siding if we own a hot tub, or salt-based pool cleaner? No, it takes an ocean of salt to cause issues.

Next week, more on sidings.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

Looking into the future of residential siding

Taking a look at steel siding. Photo on Tuesday, November 19, 2019, in Cornwall, Ont. Todd Hambleton/Cornwall Standard-Freeholder/Postmedia Network TODD HAMBLETON / TODD HAMBLETON/STANDARD-FREEHOLDER

I have seen the future of residential siding, and it is variegated steel.

Variegated simply means the panels display a series of mixed, streaked colors, meant to duplicate the natural grain patterns of stained wood.

The steel part of the deal represents absolute quality, and a standard of precision that provides for a siding that is as perfect as it gets. Essentially, the siding people have combined two things most home owners appreciate, the warmth and look of stained wood, along with a maintenance free, precisely machined product that is steel.

Installed horizontally, the ‘Distinction’ steel siding (manufactured by the Gentek Co.) is available in a variety of colors, and carries a distinguished, somewhat formal look that resembles the look of cedar, or perhaps a Brazilian hardwood.

Pattern and texture? Unlike some of today’s vinyl or steel sidings that have a raised woodgrain pattern, and traditional lap siding design, the ‘Distinction’ has a smooth finish, and relatively plain shiplap design which style dates back to the days when Toronto last won the Stanley Cup.

How long ago was that? Well, the team was then owned by Harold Ballard (deceased), the coach of the day was Punch Imlach (again…deceased), and the team’s budding young star was Dave Keon (not deceased, but  age 79, and hopeful  to see another Stanley Cup parade down Yonge Street).

So, we’re talking an old, dated siding profile. As a result, combining the look of old, along with the perfect lines and texture of steel, makes for a very unique and beautiful siding.

What style of home is best served by variegated steel siding? Because steel siding is somewhat becoming the go-to product for architects and home designers, contemporary and modern styles of homes are seeing a lot of this product.

However, a home doesn’t need to be a collection of geometric shapes in order to merit steel siding, with any style from a bungalow to a country farm house having the potential to be greatly enhanced by this stained wood look.

Decorating, or product combination limitations? Only one, gingerbread moldings. So, if you’re hopes are to build a fairy tale type home that replicates a roof made of cakes and candy, with window panes of clear sugar, and enough gingerbread type moldings and ornate spindling to attract every Hansel and Gretel in the neighborhood, then I might avoid adding steel siding to the mix.

Otherwise, variegated steel siding will work great on its own, or look especially impressive when combined with a brick or a natural stone siding.

Cost? Variegated steel sidings sell for about $6.50 per square foot, which is well below the cost of stone, and about equal to the price of brick.

However, it is double the price of a composite wood or cement board siding. But, with a 30-year warranty on the finish, which is double that of a painted composite or cement board, and 40-year warranty on the galvanized substrate, what might seem as an elevated price at first glance is indeed a good value.

If a variegated steel siding, regardless of value, still seems higher in price than what you were hoping to spend on the re-siding of your home, there’s always variegated vinyl siding.

Why “variegated”? Because most people like the look of real stained wood, but until most recently, have had to accept what was being offered in the composite or PVC siding industry, which was a solid color series of sidings.

However, now you’ll find a variegated PVC vinyl product like Mitten’s Sentry Rustic Panel series, which offers a terrific mixed color panel in both a horizontal Dutchlap, and board n’ batten type of pattern.

Cost? About $2.50 per square foot. Warranty? 50 years. Wind resistance? 290 km/h, which makes it capable of surviving a category 5 Hurricane. The variegated PVC product may not have the rigidity or formal look of steel siding, but for overall value, it’s a tough product to beat.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

Covering up

Man in a blue shirt does window installation. Model Released GALITSKAYA / GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO

Week three regarding file  No. 921, titled Meltdown, has us wrapping up the case of cold enticing hot, involving home owner Jack Frosty Snow and his bid to make his drafty home more comfortable for Barb Ma Barker, his new partner.

So far, the suggested plan of attack for making this 1970’s home more energy efficient has been pretty rudimentary, including the sealing of the more notable cracks and areas of air infiltration, and beefing up the attics insulation levels to today’s standards.

However, the next step in making this 50-year-old home more energy efficient, and more Barb appealing, is going to involve a more serious evaluation of Frosty’s situation.

On the one hand, continuing on a course to real home efficiency will involve new windows, ridged foam insulation, and new siding, a pretty significant overhaul requiring a whole lot of time, effort, and of course money.

On the other hand, Barb is a wonderful lady, owns her own swimsuit business, fills a bikini in the same manner sand pours into an hour glass, and to top it off, Barb’s a Habs fan. In other words, this lady’s a keeper.

So, with the decision to move forward likely, Jack is looking for a plan of action. Albeit a costly renovation, replacing the windows and exterior siding within the same time period is as effective a one-two renovation punch as you can get.

The curb value of the home receives a significant bump up, and the homeowner gets an excellent return on their investment.

The suggested course of action will be as follows; step one, choose a style of window, be it casement, guillotine, or slider, and the exterior door models, measure the openings, then place the order.

Because we’ll be increasing the exterior wall thickness, the window jamb depth will need to be ordered accordingly.

The windows and doors may take up to six weeks to arrive, which will allow the renovators to move forward with the balance of the renovation, starting with the removal of the existing vinyl siding.

Because the home is of standard two by four construction, the present thermal value of these walls is R-12. Before installing a new siding, we’re recommending Frosty and Bard consider wrapping the home with a two-inch rigid polyiso insulation board, which will add another R-13 of thermal value to the walls, effectively transporting this home into the 21st century, insulation wise anyway.

With a proposed R-60 attic, and R-25 walls, along with new, energy efficient windows, Frosty and Ma will be able to heat this 1200 square foot bungalow with a Bic lighter.

Due to this home being covered in siding it was the perfect subject for receiving a ridged foam wrap.

Brick or stone homes could be wrapped with foam, but you would be of course forfeiting a relatively expensive siding for a vinyl or composite alternative, which may devaluating the home, and affect its curb appeal.

Can homes be insulated from the interior? Yes, but the cost and inconvenience will be an issue, since the exterior wall electrical outlets will all have to be adjusted, with these same exterior walls having to be refinished with drywall.

The nice thing about insulating the exterior is that you get to live comfortably in your home, relatively speaking, while the renovation is taking place. With the existing siding removed, the home will be covered with a 2 inch ridged foam board, then sealed with a house wrap, which effectively cuts off any chance of drafts, and protects the ridged foam from the elements should the siding not be readily available.

Next, the home will be strapped with one by three spruce in preparation for the siding. The one by three strapping is a good idea, providing an air space for moisture to drain or evaporate, should any rain makes its way past the siding.

Composite and cement sidings will especially benefit from this spacing strategy. With this last bit of information rounding up our energy saving recommendations, case No. 921 was closed.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

Touch-it-once siding options

Conrad Hofmeister, a siding installer with Trend Home Improvement, uses a hammer to nail vinyl siding to a house while standing on a platform near 98 Street and 79 Avenue on Monday July 6, 2015 in Grande Prairie, Alta. ALEXA HUFFMAN/GRANDE PRAIRIE DAILY HERALD-TRIBUNE/POSTMEDIA NETWORK

Last week, we talked about the “touch it once” theory, and how the discipline of touching notes and other paperwork only once will prove a useful strategy in clearing up your desk area.

A de-cluttered desk reduces stress, increases your energy and workplace efficiency, and will create more free time to complete other tasks or move on to other things.

So, how can we relate the practice of touch it once to the home renovation or building biz? And, most importantly, how can we benefit from it?

Well, there are certain likes and dislikes to owning a home.

What we homeowners dislike is having to do a job twice, or consistently maintain a product. What we tend to like is free time, enabling us to enjoy all the fun things we’ve purchased for ourselves.

So, it stands to reason, if your goal is to do less home maintenance and gain more free time, then choosing home products that need only be touched once should be your guide to future purchases.

Last week we mentioned the value of extending the warranty on your asphalt roofing shingles another five years by opting for the Weather-Tite roofing system, which is an installation program that has a certified roofer following a specific series of shingle-application procedures. For a few hundred dollars more, an extra five years of not having to deal with roofing issues will be a welcome return on that investment.

When it comes to choosing an exterior siding for your home, any little piggy will suggest you stick with brick or stone. Lasting several generations, the chances of a homeowner needing to touch their brick or stone siding a second time are between zero and none.

Should a home settle over the years, hairline cracks could develop in the mortar, which will be an easy fix for your local mason. Otherwise, a brick home signifies absolute stability, delivering the best in long term home value.

If future home renovations include replacing your existing wood siding, installing regular brick and stone, and the aforementioned mortar, could prove challenging (but not impossible) if your present home has a foundation whose ledge is not wide enough to support the depth and weight of a brick or stone product.

However, there are dry-stack (no mortar required) stone alternatives, such as the Fusion Stone product, whose system of clips allows the installer to fasten this man-made stone onto a regular exterior plywood wall. No mortar required, and no foundation modifications or engineering feats need be blueprinted.

Fusion Stone offers a lifetime warranty on a siding product that like the brick and stone originals, will last for generations.

Other long-term siding investments include Hardie Board, which is a fibre cement product, and vinyl siding, with both products having 50-year warranties.

Hardie Board is a painted product, so although the fibre cement will never rot or deteriorate, its painted finish may require attention in 15 to 20 years.

Vinyl siding, on the other hand, should have its substrate and colour last the full 50 years, which makes it most likely the second-best value to brick or stone. Regardless of vinyl being this great value, with basically zero maintenance – unless of course some little punk fires a puck into it, or dad sets the barbecue at 600 F then parks it a couple of inches away from the wall – some home renovators or builders may dismiss vinyl siding as too cheap an alternative.

True, the regular horizontal vinyl siding line of products is relatively inexpensive, while having little fortitude or product integrity to defend against even mid-range product shock. However, that’s what you get for $0.65 per square foot.

But, if you take the time to look at some of the slightly heavier vinyl sidings, with a slightly higher cost of course, most homeowners would be quite impressed with the texture, vivid colour, and structural integrity of these premium products.

Next week: touching things once means saying “bye-bye” to wood.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

That’s a wrap

When building, we need to wrap or protect most of the lumber, while leaving a portion exposed so that the wood may be allowed to ìbreatheî or basically expel moisture at a more natural rate. Postmedia Network

I think the inventors of Baggies sandwich bags, and Saran Wrap, are two of the most intelligent and opportunist people in the world. Intelligent because they’ve managed to develop a lightweight, flexible, and user friendly manner of sealing and protecting foodstuffs. Opportunists because they’ve not only developed something useful, but have enabled us, as humans, to fulfill one of our most instinctive and powerful needs, and that’s the simple desire of wanting to wrap things.

What do we do with a newborn baby? Although it’s referred to as a swaddle, we’re essentially wrapping ‘em. Bloody finger? Wrap it. Christmas gifts, sprained ankle, hole in the car’s muffler? Wrap, wrap, wrap.

After supper the other night, I wrapped or bagged 10 different leftover items and tossed them in the fridge. Approximately 50 per cent of these items will see action in the immediate future, two to three things might be caught in time for use, with the last one or two items forgotten and allowed to develop into 15 types of mold. Regardless, they were all good wraps.

What do we do with a staff meeting that’s gone 30 minutes into overtime? We wrap it up. So, what do we do with basically any wood project or structure? Well, if you’re still not sure as to the theme of this week’s rant, for the good of the wood, you wrap it. For all intents and purposes, plywoods, basic framework, and wooden posts, will stick around for the long term if they’re kept dry. The strategy to keeping wood dry in a four season climate such as ours is challenging because wood is a product that naturally absorbs moisture. So, with a “dry season” unfortunately not forming part of the four seasons we experience, our plywoods and 2×4 framing lumber are always in a state where they’re retaining some level of humidity, regardless of the fact the lumber was kiln dried at some point in its production. As a result, we can’t simply saran wrap every piece of lumber because that would trap the humidity, which would lead to our lumber looking like the aforementioned science experiment regarding the 15 types of mold. Instead, we need to wrap or protect most of the lumber, while leaving a portion of the plywood or lumber exposed (with these exposed sides usually facing the interior of the building) so that the wood may be allowed to “breathe” or basically expel moisture at a more natural rate.

So, whether you’re building a shed, or 3000 sq. ft. home, we always protect the plywood walls with a house wrap. Because the interior, or what’s referred to as the warm side of a standard, insulated wall, must have a plastic vapor barrier, in order to prevent moisture from entering the wall cavity, the outside wall cannot be saran wrapped, or covered in the same manner, because that would trap the moisture already in the plywood, and stud framework. So, we cover the exterior wall with a house wrap, a product that sheds water, should rain or snow makes its way past the siding, but is still porous enough to allow the wood to breathe.

Our plywood roofs require the same type of protection. Although asphalt paper was for the longest time the product of choice, synthetic felts are the better product. Similar to a house wrap, synthetic roof felts shed water and breathe. However, they differ from house wraps in that they reflect UV light, and are far superior to paper felts because they can protect a roof for up to six months, which is a real bonus when inclement weather causes unforeseen delays.

Other areas in need of protection are the wooden framework around windows and doors. When the caulking around a window or door frame begins to shrink or crack, water infiltrates into the wall and puddles on the sill, leading to mold or rot. For this reason, we now wrap three out of the four sides of the wooden frames with a rubberized membrane.

Next week, more on wraps. Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

The only thing that looks like wood, is wood

Wood siding is beautiful, but takes work to maintain. Postmedia Network

Case no. 215, titled “the winds of change” has a Mr. Martin V. Particular, aka ‘MVP’, due to his prowess on the local seniors pickleball circuit, looking for a solution to an exterior siding problem he and his wife Penny P., aka Penny Poo, have been dealing with for several years now.

The Particulars own a home with a beautifully stained, pine horizontal siding. The situation? The back of the home faces the south-west, and therefore sees a ton of prolonged sunlight, while having to suffer through the brunt of our inclement weather. The problem? Stained wood sidings don’t exactly thrive under these conditions. As a result, Martin finds himself sanding and re-staining the backside of his home on practically a biannual basis, due to the finish having peeled or crackled.

MVP doesn’t so much hate the task of sanding and staining, since the results make for a very attractive, and unique type of real wood finish, but of course the time involved in keeping this siding looking pristine is edging into his practice sessions, which is killing the chances of him and penny Poo maintaining their no.1 ranking on the seniors mixed doubles tour.

Homeowner’s goal? Martin and Penny are looking for a comparable, horizontal, maintenance free type of siding that will match the color of the three other exterior walls of the home. The challenge? The “V” in Martin V. Particular often stands for “Very”. So, this isn’t simply a case of saying goodbye to a high maintenance wood product, and replacing it with any number of composite, vinyl, steel, or fiber cement type sidings available on the market today. The very Particulars are looking for something that is both maintenance free, and a close match to the walnut stained pine planks on the balance of their home.

Likelihood of success? You’d have a better chance of convincing the Habs Carey Price to switch from goaltending, to filling the vacant no.1 center position between Max Pacioretty and Brendan Gallagher. Unfortunately, the only thing that looks like wood, is wood. The composites and various other maintenance free sidings all somewhat resemble wood, and to the neighbor driving by at 80 km per hour, basically looks like wood, but when put side by side with wood, usually makes for a disappointing match.

So, with Martin Particular being very particular, finding a suitable alternative to his existing pine siding has to this point been fruitless. Suggested plans of action? The existing pine siding is beautiful, and in good condition, with the only issue being maintenance. So, instead of replacing it, why not protect it? In essence, all this southern facing wall needs is a little shade.

Extreme option no.1, bring in three 40 ft. hard maple trees. Otherwise, the Particulars should perhaps extend the roof over their backyard deck and patio. Or, consider installing either one large, or a couple of pergolas along this same backyard deck area. If this southwest facing wall is getting too much sun, then so too are the Particulars. The MVP and Penny Poo are already getting more than their share of vitamin D due to regular outdoor pickleballing. With a pergola providing intermittent shade, or full shade if you chose the aluminum model with the movable louvers, it may be the best and least intrusive solution, since a pergola is self- standing, and requires minimum deck preparation.

Or, paint the wall. Painting would keep the shape of the wood siding intact, but obviously forfeit the warmth of the wood grain. However, paints last longer than stains, and require only repainting, as opposed to the more arduous task of having to sand, stain, and seal. Otherwise, this wood siding may have flat-lined, or basically served its purpose, and it’s time for MVP to call it.

The alternatives to wood are many, with several pre-finished steel and aluminum sidings offering beautiful, wood grain type finishes.

Until further notice, case no. 215 is closed.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

Watch fall temperatures

If you’re planning on doing some caulking in the fall, make sure the temperature is at least 5 degrees celsius. Postmedia Network.

So, you’re finally getting around to preparing your home for the winter. Great!

Fall is an excellent time to be doing outdoor work. Not too hot, not too cold, and with the days getting shorter, darkness will force you to quit your tasks at a more reasonable hour, placing you safely in your slippers so that you may be fed and couch bound with a beer in your hand, well in time to catch the start of the hockey game.

What is the task at hand? To bolster our home’s system of defense. Who is the enemy? The demon is well known, and is the same, notorious culprit that’s been slowly destroying homes for years, that being water. It’s form? Rain, snow, sleet, or basically anything that pours or puddles. Strategy? To seal by means of a paint, caulking, or mastic (roofing and foundation cements), anything that resembles or what might be described as a crack.

There are a lot of products that form the exterior shell of the home, and the cracks are usually found where one of these products, such as your windows and doors, butts up against a foreign product, such as a brick or vinyl siding. The products themselves are usually fine, whereby the inherent design of a window, or the manner in which brick or vinyl siding is installed, are by themselves perfectly functional in diverting the elements. However, the challenge to the builder is joining two products such as these to form a watertight seal. Achieving this goal will require the installer using various membranes and flashing products, with the finishing touch to this assembly being a bead of caulking. Over time, it’s the bead of caulking that’s going to shrink and crack, which leaves the homeowner with no other choice but to re-caulk this important first line of defence.

Start by examining the roof (binoculars will help) specifically where the roofs flashings contact either the roof vents, or the side of the home, and make note of where the deficiencies, or problem areas are. Follow the same procedure for all windows and doors.

Although the fall weather provides a comfortable working atmosphere, the challenge at this point will be the falling temperatures. Caulking, paints or stains, and mastics, install better and more easily when the temperatures are at least 5 degrees Celsius. When the mercury drops below this basic user line, you risk the product not sticking properly to the surface it’s being adhered to. When caulking doesn’t stick, it won’t seal, which will mean having to follow this process over again next season.

Basic step number one, remove the paints, caulking, or mastic products from the car and put them somewhere in the house as soon as you get back from the building supply center. Don’t leave them in the garage, or forget them in the trunk of the car overnight. When caulking and mastics are left in temperatures that are close to freezing, they don’t squeeze out of the tube so well. When a cold caulking is moving slowly up the spout, the novice user will become impatient, and inevitably begin to over-squeeze the caulking lever, which usually results in the caulking blowing out the bottom of the tube. A caulking backfire has yet to result in serious injury, but the resulting gooey hands, and loss of what was a perfectly good tube of caulking, will be frustrating.

Next, watch the weather reports, and choose your time accordingly. You’ll want to install the caulking or mastic (roof repairs) while the temperatures will be in the 5 degree Celsius range for two to three hours.

If you’re hoping to do some fall painting or staining, or if the foundation is in need of parging, then you’ll require a 24-hour window of plus temperatures, due to these water based products taking longer to cure. So, if frost is expected overnight, you’ll have to wait until the next warm spell before proceeding.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

Cementing your future

This guy knows what he’s doing. You might not, when it comes to working with cement. Postmedia Network

Today we’re going to be dabbing into the trade of mixing and applying cement.

I use the term “dab” because cement work, or concrete repair, isn’t something the average office softie ought to jump into full bore. Unless of course through a series of bad investments or sure bets gone lame at the track, you’ve indebted yourself beyond the point of recovery, and as an example to others you’ve been persuaded to jump into a bucket of soon to be cured concrete by fellows simply known to you as “Vito” and “the Razor”, let’s otherwise limit this first stab at concrete to a small repair.

Regardless of what type of concrete, be it wall, floor, steps, or walkway, is in need of repair or resurfacing, the strategy to preparing the area remains pretty well consistent.

First we scrub the area being repaired (using a steel, or otherwise stiff bristled brush), then sweep the surface clean with a fine, softer bristled broom. Next, rinse the area with the garden hose or spray bottle of water. Brush, sweep, rinse, that’s basically the prep work required for concrete repair.

Be sure to wear safety goggles and gloves at all times. Pre-mixed concrete powders usually have a Portland cement additive, which is corrosive. Not that these components will eat through your skin like battery acid, but with prolonged exposure, will certainly cause irritation. Should you get any powdered mix in your eyes, simply douse your face with water.

Tools for the job will include a bucket, trowels (pointing and pool), a quick mixer, and a drill. A pointing trowel is triangular in shape, and is handy for shaping cement to form a corner on a wall or step. A pool trowel is basically a rectangular trowel with rounded corners. Square cornered, or drywall type trowels, will gouge the finish as you spread the concrete mix over a wider surface, such as a platform or walkway. The pool trowel simply allows you to more easily float the trowel back and forth without creating too many lines.

A quick mixer is essentially a heavy duty whisk, or blender, that fits into the chuck of a regular drill. Don’t walk into this project without your quick mixer, thinking its function could be replaced by a paint stir stick and a little elbow grease, with the 15-20 buck investment better spent on a Tim’s run for coffee and muffins.

Depending on your choice of pre-mixed concretes, the working and setting time for many of these compounds is anywhere between 15 and 20 minutes. So, if after 5-6 minutes of stirring, an old hockey injury starts to creep back into play, requiring you to take a few moments of down time to wipe your brow and work the kink out of your shoulder, upon returning to the pail, you may find your first batch of mixed has turned into a secondary anchor for the boat.

The convenient aspect about the concrete repair products available today is that they come in a pre-mixed powder. This powder formula contains both the cement components, and the necessary bonding agents, which basically enables these new cement products to stick to older, existing surfaces. Don’t be intimidated by the number of various cement repair products you’ll find on the shelf of your local building supply store. The industry has become task specific, which was designed to simplify things, but on the other hand has created shelves full of pictured containers that can certainly leave the first time shopper a little bewildered. My suggestion is to let the salesperson know what type of repair project you’re attempting, then let them help you choose the most suitable mix for the job. Although there is certainly some crossover in that some pre-mixed cements could perform a number of tasks, you definitely wouldn’t want to choose a poly-plug compound (which dries in two minutes) and use it to build up a broken step corner that may take you 5-10 minutes to shape.

Good cementing.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

Accessorizing your exterior siding

When a fellow’s out buying himself a new suit, there should be more on his mind besides purchasing the standard jacket and a matching pair of pants. He should be thinking accessorize.

If he’s to look like the real deal, he’ll probably need a dress shirt, perhaps a new tie, matching belt, and if you’re going all out, don’t forget the argyle socks and a little pouf for the side pocket.

Women, on the other hand, generally have accessorizing down to a science. They already know that the purchase of a dress would not be complete without the appropriate jewelry, purse, three pairs of shoes, light jacket, new microwave oven for the kitchen, and more cat toys for Fluffy.

However, and although versed on the concept of accessorizing, couples tend to forget the many trim options available to them once they’ve chosen their exterior siding. After deciding on either a vinyl, wood composite, or cement board type product, then having made the color choice, the next topic should be a discussion on the trim-board.

Why use a trim board around windows and doors? For the same reason PK Subban chose to accessorize his beaver pelt overcoat with a purple fedora at last season’s Winter Classic All Star game. Because it looks good.

Now, I’m not suggesting the use of trim-boards around your windows and doors will have an impact equal to such a fashion statement. However, the reasoning behind trim-boards is simple. Homes with trim-boards look more attractive than those without.

What is trim-board and what’s its purpose? Trim-board is a 1-inch thick piece of either lumber, composite, PVC material, or cement fiber product, depending on which siding you’ve chosen. Generally, when you chose a composite or fiber cement type siding, you would stick with the matching composite or fiber cement trim-board. Trim-boards are available in board widths anywhere from 3-1/2 to 11-1/2 inches wide. The 3-1/2 and 5-1/2 inch wide trim-board planks are the sizes chosen most often for around windows and doors. The wider boards are the preferred choice for skirting along the base of the siding, and for use as a fascia board. Trim-boards, along with the appropriate trim-molding, can also be installed just under the soffit, creating a beautiful crown molding type of accent that follows the roofline. Depending on your tastes, trim board planks are available with either a smooth, or woodgrain type finish.

Color? Trim board color is of course subjective. Painting the trim boards the same color as the siding will provide a much more subtle touch or impression. When the trim boards are color matched to the window frames and soffit material, presuming these two components are of a different color than the siding, the effect has considerably more impact.

The purpose, or raison d’être of trim-board, is to enhance. Today, most window units are made of vinyl, or combinations of vinyl and aluminum. And, with more emphasis being placed on window operation, and on getting more glass for the buck, the frames have become much narrower than the wooden framed windows of the past. With less window frame, comes less window, and as a result, less impression. So, we offset this loss of window frame by adding a matching trim board around the windows and doors. Wide, outside corners, are another way trim-boards can add a more stately impression to any home. Most sidings come with standard 3 inch wide outside corners.

New home builders, or those renovating, should consider 5-1/2 inch trim-board planks for the corners instead. For a few bucks more, this easy modification will deliver more than its weight in value and good looks. Key to successful trim-boarding? Don’t make them an afterthought. Use the thicker, 1 to 1-1/4 inch planks, and install them before the siding. After the fact means using a thinner board, delivering less impact, while also creating gaps (otherwise known as homes for wasps and spiders) along the siding ridges.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard