Don’t move that wall

Would you go to a zoo, take out your pair of pocket bolt cutters, and free a tiger of its cage?

Would you venture out onto a pond, the day after minus degree weather created an ever so thin sheet of ice over top, to organize a game of shinny for the local seniors club?

Would you try to re-position the cheese on a rat trap after it’s been set? The mechanism, after all, is designed to snap the neck of a relatively tough rodent.

Therefore, is it really necessary to find out whether pain will result if you should happen to trigger the spring?

Participating in any one of these scenarios would seem unlikely. Then again, why do people, coffee in hand and sitting comfortably at their kitchen table, and after feeling an overwhelming urge for more open space, delay refilling their cup, and take a sledgehammer to the nearest wall?

It’s what was documented as “sudden claustrophobia syndrome” by the renowned psychologist Fred Sigmund, who not so surprisingly, authored the followup, and timely homeowner’s renovation manual titled, “Our roof collapsed on my mother-in-law, and other related fix ups.”

Most homeowners want more space and more natural light, with existing walls the obvious culprit in preventing this from happening. There can be several interior walls in a home, falling into one of two categories, those being “dividing” or “load bearing”. Dividing walls are usually recognized by their 2×3 or 2×4 construction framework, and by the fact they’re normally shorter in length, whereby if we’re talking the 8 ft. wall used to separate a bedroom from the bathroom, it’s most likely a dividing wall. Load bearing walls will span the width or length of the home, and are normally constructed with 2×6 lumber, so they’re usually recognizable by their thicker appearance.

Now, a load bearing wall isn’t necessarily continuous wall, it could be broken up to allow for a hallway or archway. That being said, and even though there’s an open space underneath, the load bearing wall will have some type of continuous beam overhead, with the weight of this beam supported by extra framing in the walls. The difference between a dividing wall and a load bearing wall is that one simply divides, while the other keeps the roof and floor structure from collapsing.
Besides a load bearing wall usually being a couple of inches thicker than a dividing wall, load bearing walls can normally be confirmed by the fact they’re supported by a wall, or beam, directly underneath. The point of one load bearing wall being directly under a load bearing wall from the floor above, is to allow for the transfer of weight from the trusses and snow load, all the way down to the concrete footing in the basement.

Load bearing walls are structurally engineered to keep the home solid, and free from sag and compromise. So, as a homeowner, or person about to buy a home, you never touch a wall before having an engineer, architect, or accredited home builder, have a look at things. Plus, be aware of the term “usually”, as in load bearing walls are usually thicker, or usually run the full span of the home, or are usually supported by jack posts and a beam in the basement. Home designs aren’t all alike, with some engineering strategies not following traditional means of load bearing support.

Plus, if you’re the fourth or fifth owner of a home, particularly if its 50-100 years old, previous owners may have changed things. Older, larger homes were often designed with small rooms for energy preserving reasons. With the desire for more open space, walls were often removed without the consideration of whether they were load bearing or not. Which, would account for why many older homes have squeaky floors and slanted ceilings. It’s not necessarily that they’re old, they may very well be missing a leg to stand on.

Good building and safe renovating.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

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