The should’a, could’a, would’a dilemma

I got a call the other day from a lady, a senior, who’s completely dissatisfied with the renovation work just completed on her older home.

I don’t know this lady, nor was I familiar with the contractor responsible for this debacle, nor did we supply any of the material for this project, but she wanted me to pass by her place in order to inspect the job, pass judgment, confirm the inadequacy of this job performance, so that once documented, this fellow could be taken to court for the sake of her complete financial restitution.

When I informed this person I am not a licensed contractor, nor a home inspector and that I don’t really feel comfortable leaving the safe confines of my office – because I’ve watched enough horror movies to know unassuming retailers like myself, upon entering a dark and gloomy century home owned by some little old lady will, nine times out of 10, end up buried in the basement – she understood my apprehension.

According to the descriptive manner relating to how these various wall, window, and floor products were installed, there was more than likely a cause for concern.

However, passing judgment on the work of others is easy, especially if you haven’t seen the before picture and are unfamiliar with the circumstances and limitations relating to this project.

In other words, sure the floor is crooked and maybe the windows don’t fit so flush with the inside wall, but was it contractor incompetence that led to these errors, or a restricted budget with limited resources?

Regardless, there are legal means by which to pursue somebody who’s failed to satisfy the stipulations set out in your working contract. Although I’m unqualified to comment further on the legal or courtroom process, what I can say with assurance is the strategy of chasing somebody who doesn’t want to be found in order to be financially compensated should be a last-ditch effort.

How do we avoid these legal costs of time and money?

Do your contractor-research homework before starting the project.

In this case, the person hired was a friend, of a friend, of a neighbour, and was known to do renovation jobs for cash after completing his regular job of delivering pizza and smuggling cigarettes across the St. Lawrence River.

There’s nothing saying such a versatile fellow can’t be a qualified and licensed contractor as well. But, when their cell phone numbers change from week to week, and always with a robotic message response, the odds of this guy being legit are pretty slim.

This lady should have given one of us building supply dealers a call. From a list of qualified and licensed carpenters, she could have chosen a few names and requested quotes pertaining to each job. Upon meeting the various carpenters, she would have then chosen the person most qualified for the job, based on references provided, who best understood what she wanted, and who she felt most comfortable with.

Two mistakes first-time, or only occasional renovating homeowners do, is one: choose a contractor based on who’s available at the time; and, two: go too big, demanding too many tasks of a contractor, especially if they’re only a two-or-three-person outfit.

If your preferred contractor is weeks away from being available, book him in accordingly, and wait.

Unless you’ve got a foot of water in the basement, or a tree limb puncturing through the east side of your home, rarely does a home renovation fall under the category of urgent.

If you’ve got a lot of jobs to get done, break up your renovations into manageable segments. So, if you’re going to be replacing a few windows, get that done, assess the quality of the workmanship, then move on to the flooring, or whatever’s next.

Taking things step by step keeps you in control of the situation, helps minimize the mess, and maintains your sanity throughout.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

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