The solution to peeling paint

“Why is the paint on my deck peeling?” is a question asked by many a homeowner, and is an inquiry that ranks just below such queries as “why is the sky blue?” or “how do airplanes stay up in the air” and the always thought-provoking “what’s really wrong with Carey Price’s knee?”

The answer to each question can be unequivocally explained of course by the laws of science and physics. So, and due to various moisture related, atmospheric issues, we know why paint peels.

Knowing why something happens usually leads to a cure or means of prevention. This way the problem doesn’t persist, nor arises again. However, paints and stains are one of those procedural type products, with a relatively clear set of rules to follow, that for some reason, are rarely adhered to by the average homeowner. Therefore, if you don’t want your decking paint to peel, or wear excessively fast, you’re going to have to follow procedure. If you’re not the procedural type, or don’t enjoy reading fine print instructions, or simply don’t like being told what to do, then your solution to your paint peeling issue is going to be pretty straightforward.

Basically, trash your existing wood planks in exchange for composite decking. If this solution seems extreme, then let’s review what it’s going to take to get a paint or stain to stick.

In 99 per cent of paint peeling cases, the reason for paints or stains not sticking to the wood decking is because the decking planks are filled with moisture. The other one per cent of failures can be attributed to various unnatural phenomena, such as gremlins urinating on your freshly stained deck while you sleep, or the heat from a recently landed Martian spaceship.

In other words, it’s all about keeping the moisture out of the wood before you paint or stain.

First, we prepare the wood by sanding both faces of the decking plank. Sanding the wood opens the pores of the grain, which in turn allows the stain to penetrate more deeply.

Don’t pressure-wash. Pressure washing certainly opens up the pores of the wood, but at the same time will drive moisture deep into the grain. Again, the reason paints or stains don’t stick is because the wood is wet. Wood saturated with water will be incapable of further absorbing a stain. Furthermore, water pressurized into the wood may take weeks, even months, to evaporate. If, during that time, you choose to stain the wood, it’ll be a ticking time bomb as to when those first signs of peeling will appear.

Why then, is pressure washing so popular? Because it’s easy, and like a slice of pecan pie with ice cream, provides immediate satisfaction. But, it’s not good for the wood.

Next, seal the underside of your decking boards with a clear sealer. For those existing decks, this will either mean crawling underneath, or removing the deck planks and sealing the underside in a more comfortable manner. Removing the decking planks is the better strategy, but is usually only possible if they’ve been screwed into position. A decking board that’s been nailed down may be too difficult to pry up, without damaging the edges, leaving you with no other choice but to join the spiders in the underneath deck world.

Sealing the underneath of the plank provides protection against one half of the moisture element, that being ground water. Then, we seal the top. Clear sealers offer fair protection, semi-transparent stains are better, with opaque stains providing the best, long term results. I recommend first sealing the decking with an exterior primer, followed by two coats of opaque stain. “Do we really need a primer?” or “I’ve heard of those two in one, primer/paint products, is this available?” are questions we field often.

First, yes, there isn’t a stain or paint application that wouldn’t benefit from first being primed. Secondly, two in one’s are effective marketing for the lazy. For best results, follow the program.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

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