Up on the roof and get ready to shingle

What’s the first thing a homeowner should do upon receiving his load of asphalt shingles, felt paper, and various other roofing materials? Take the receipt, place it in a shoe box labelled ‘House expenses’ and set this box high upon a shelf in the bedroom closet for the next 30 years.

Even if roofing shingles are poorly installed, or get nailed to an unsuitable surface, or are otherwise forced to suffer through conditions that would in no way permit proper tab adhesion, they’ll probably do the job for at least six-eight years. By year nine the granular surface will begin to loosen, rolling down the roof into the eavestroughing. Then the shingle tabs will start to curl and buckle. Years 10 through 12 will show further deterioration, and as the shingles begin to detach from the nails, the next big wind will have the tabs flying off so fast you would have thought a flock of crows had just been disturbed off their perch.

Then the roof leaks. Then the customer questions why their 30 year asphalt shingles lasted barely half that long. That seems to be the pattern for most consumers who fail to keep their roofing receipts. Perhaps it’s just fate, but those persons who keep their receipts, rarely run into issues. So, keep your receipts. Without them, the claim or warranty process will be nothing but frustration.

Which brings to question, what’s with all the class-action lawsuits against the asphalt shingle industry? Because Canadians simply lay blame and brood, while Americans tend to skip this emotional state and move directly into the game of suits and litigation, most of the issues are State side.

With a home’s roof taking the brunt of all weather conditions, while receiving the least care upkeep wise, it’s easy to find a lot of unsatisfied consumers. Basically, most of the claim issues are directed towards what is referred to as an organic shingle. Organic shingles were the original specie, and had a felt base that was dipped in tar, then covered with ceramic coated granules. Production of organic shingles ceased in 2010, and were replaced by what the industry now calls a fiberglass shingle, because the substrate is a sheet of woven fiberglass, as opposed to a heavy paper felt.

However, the process of shingle making remained the same. Impregnate the substrate with tar, then cover with granules. So, an asphalt shingle is basically the same as it ever was, and of course looks the same as before, since the only modification to the new version is the hidden fiberglass base. Why the change to fiberglass? Because it proved to have a higher resistance to heat and wind, which really meant little to the Canadian market, since we lack the necessary trailer parks to attract tornadoes, and might get two days in July with temperatures above 30 degrees Celsius. However, it was cheaper to manufacture, and that’s all that counted.

Why did the organics fail? Could have been the product, or installation, or any number of factors. What we do know is that to ensure your new fiberglass shingles last as long as possible, we’ll need to change our traditional way of installation. Because all new homes use plywood or OSB (oriented strand board) on the roof, having a smooth, clean, reliable substrate, isn’t an issue. Older homes, whose foundations were framed with 1×8 spruce planks, with these planks salvaged and subsequently installed on the roof, are going to have a problem. Plus, it was also common practice to layer shingles, burying two generations of shingles under a brand new third layer. With the organic shingle of the day being so malleable, and quite adaptable to the inconsistent surface created by the 1×8 lumber and layers of shingles, it wasn’t uncommon to get 20 years out of a shingle. With fiberglass shingles, the practice of layering will need to stop.

Next week, installing the modern asphalt shingle.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

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