What comes after the front door

Refurbishing a home is always a little stressful, although the cleansing process does get easier with every trip to the curb.

Ahh, the curb— the spot where a homeowner can finally lay to rest their shag area rug, macramé wall hangings, everything and anything wicker, famed artwork such as “Dogs playing cards,” and anything the colour orange, with no quarrel or judgment from neighbours, provided all is conveniently stockpiled beside a sign reading free stuff.

So, for those folks who haven’t made any decorating changes since Lavern & Shirley went off the air, let’s follow up on last week’s task of choosing new interior doors with a few more door-related improvements, including replacing the door hinges, door knobs, and door trims.

Replacing the interior slab doors is as good an opportunity as ever to change the door knobs. By changing the door knobs, you’ll also need to consider replacing the hinges, since they’re likely brass in colour, or after a series of simpler renovations, are covered in paint blotches.

Regardless, the odds favour you not sticking with the rather outdated polished brass knob, or brass/chrome combo— again, favourites that date back to the days of the Fonz.

Because the hinges and door knob should colour match, be sure to choose a door knob before ordering your pre-hung door. This way, your pre-hung unit can be ordered with hinges that colour match the door knob.

Choosing a door knob? Actually, forget the knob style, and instead choose the more versatile lever model. Other than simply looking attractive enough, I can’t think of any reason why someone would choose a round- or ball-shaped door knob.

Besides scraping your knuckles against the door jamb every time the average right handed person opens a door that swings in towards the left, unless you’re somewhat ambidextrous, and can remind yourself which hand to proceed forward with in order to avoid bloodshed, the action of having to turn a knob can be a further challenge for those with joint pain. Plus, turning a round knob takes a relatively firm grip.

If your hands happen to be covered in butter while being elbows deep into stuffing the turkey, and a bladder emergency sparked by a previous night of drink and revelry has you rushing towards a bathroom door with a round knob, well— after a few harried moments, you may have to accept this as being your last moment of dignity.

On the other hand, with a lever handle you simply drop your elbow on the latch, and proceed forward.

That’s the real advantage of a lever style of handle: you could be carrying a hamper of clothing in one arm, ironing board in the other, have a small child resting on your shoulders, and as long as you can manage to get a foot, knee, or elbow to make contact with the lever, you’re in.

Next, casings and baseboards— What’s in style these days?

Wider, with maybe a slight bevel, and painted. Gone, style-wise, are the 2-1/8-inch casings and 3-1/8-inch baseboards in either a colonial or plain mahogany finish. So, as you proceed in choosing a new casing and base profile, don’t be overwhelmed by the increased mass in these new molding offerings.

Generally, you should be looking at a casing that’s three to 3.5 inches wide, along with a baseboard that rises up 4.5 to 5.5 inches. The very plain, or perfectly rectangular casings and baseboards, deliver a contemporary look, which goes well with a plain, painted smooth door, which in turn seems to suit an apartment or condo type of atmosphere.

However, if were talking a home, and you’ve chosen a smooth-surfaced door with a raised panel, or door panel resembling shaker-styled cabinetry, then a relatively plain molding with a slightly shaped, or beveled edge, would be my recommendation.

Note, before ordering a particular style of casing, verify the existing space between door and wall will accommodate this wider model.

Good building.

As published by the Standard-Freeholder
Handyman's Hints Standard-Freeholder Cornwall Ontario by Chris Emard

Leave a Reply